Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39
  1. #21
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North east, England
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I'll do some experimenting in a little bit see if turning off the wifi helps (bluetooth already off), I have turned it off before when recording a mix because I'd seen it suggested but never checked the latency.

    But I have a feeling this will make no difference as its not the processing time where its slowing down, but i'll check back in a bit and let you know.

  2. #22
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North east, England
    Posts
    47

    Default

    While messing around on the S4 last night I found that turning tha WiFi off did nothing to help. Also 8.4ms is the lowest I can have while on 48100, Don't get me wrong even on 8.4ms I have a very responsive controller but...... But it's still pissing me off that I know a 3rd party USB soundcard will out put in 4.2ms

    Also the fact we have (padi) both have mac books and the S4 yet your time is so low

    Peace out guys!

  3. #23
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    93

    Default

    I really think you're searching for something that may not even be necessary. 8.4ms is still incredibly small. You should be fine when playing music especially considering that human error (for pushing buttons) is more than 100 times that amount. (This is for your thumb to a stopwatch :P )
    Macbook, Novation Ultranova, Novation Launchpad x2, Behringer BCD3000, Allen & Heath Xone 1D x2 (I'm trying to sell these right now), Traktor Scratch Pro v1.2.7 (It's Legal)
    http://www.facebook.com/dynamicsmusic
    http://soundcloud.com/dynamicsmusic

  4. #24
    Tech Guru xtianw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Anaheim, CA
    Posts
    1,432

    Default

    keep in mind.

    the s4's usb cable is also carrying high rez midi data along with the audio signal.

    your audiobox has the luxury of only carrying audio.
    Baked Chicken | Brown Rice | Asparagus | Apple Juice | Snack Wells | Pretzel Chips | Lots of Water

  5. #25
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North east, England
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xtianw View Post
    keep in mind.

    the s4's usb cable is also carrying high rez midi data (NHL Protocol!) along with the audio signal.

    your audiobox has the luxury of only carrying audio.
    I have suggested that this be the case in a earlier post.
    Also anything over 10ms is noticeable to me when using the jogwheel, but what is bothering me is that I know there are people out there running pretty much the exact same set up but getting a lot lower latency.

    Also if I lower the sample rate the output time go's up

    I can get the lowest latency on my system running 96000 with a larger buffer than with 44100 with the smallest buffer. To me it makes no sense, I was hoping someone could explain whats happening.
    Last edited by DJ Shifty Sheep; 03-18-2011 at 08:39 PM.

  6. #26
    Banhammerized theory28's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4,011

    Default

    "Also if I lower the sample rate the output time go's up"

    Become a Fan, And View My Latest Mixes | DJTT Chatroom (FB)
    Quote Originally Posted by photojojo View Post
    If the pack of lions are in sync then they're not real lions so it doesn't count.

  7. #27
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    233

    Default

    [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_audio"]Digital audio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:Text_document_with_red_question_mark.svg" class="image"><img alt="Text document with red question mark.svg" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Text_document_with_red_question_mark.svg/40px-Text_document_with_red_question_mark.svg.png"@@AME PARAM@@commons/thumb/a/a4/Text_document_with_red_question_mark.svg/40px-Text_document_with_red_question_mark.svg.png[/ame]

    The reason increasing the sample rate reduces the latency is simple math.
    You've got 48000 noises a second or 98000 noises a second.
    Now, your buffer is 128 - traktor stores 128 noises and plays them all.
    SO traktor empties it's buffer at a rate of 48000 or 98000 giving...
    37.5 (48000) or 76.5~(98000) new buffers each second.

    Meaning...
    When I press play traktor stores 128 noises in memory BEFORE any sound is sent.
    When I say scratch, traktor adds this new sound to the end of the buffer and it gets played but not until after the other 128 noises have played.
    The time it takes to get to this sound (the latency) is decided by the sample rate as I showed above.

    Did that make any sense kids? Or do I get another talking fruit?

  8. #28
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North east, England
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Remote View Post
    Digital audio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The reason increasing the sample rate reduces the latency is simple math.
    You've got 48000 noises a second or 98000 noises a second.
    Now, your buffer is 128 - traktor stores 128 noises and plays them all.
    SO traktor empties it's buffer at a rate of 48000 or 98000 giving...
    37.5 (48000) or 76.5~(98000) new buffers each second.

    Meaning...
    When I press play traktor stores 128 noises in memory BEFORE any sound is sent.
    When I say scratch, traktor adds this new sound to the end of the buffer and it gets played but not until after the other 128 noises have played.
    The time it takes to get to this sound (the latency) is decided by the sample rate as I showed above.

    Did that make any sense kids? Or do I get another talking fruit?
    I understand that but mine do's the opposite of normal!

    If I LOWER the sample rate the output time go's UP!

  9. #29
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Remote View Post
    Did that make any sense kids?
    absolutely. let me try to formulate it in different words.

    The buffer in Traktor determines the number of samples that are stored. so a buffer size of 128 means that 128 samples are stored.

    now, if you work at 44.1kHz, there are 44,100 samples per second. Let's say we start with a full buffer. If the computer cannot process audio (suppose it's because it's busy doing other stuff), the audio can continue to play without interruption until the buffer is emptied.

    how long is the buffer in units of time? well, we have 128 samples / (44,100 samples / s) ~ 0.0029s = 2.9ms. Thus, at a sample rate of 44.1kHz, the music can continue to play for just under three milliseconds until we get a dropout.

    now suppose we double the sample rate to 88.2kHz. if we keep the buffer size at 128, you can go through similar math to find that the music can continue to play for just under 1.5ms until we get a dropout.

    thus, when we increase the sample rate without increasing the buffer, the buffer becomes less generous and the chance of dropouts or glitches increases. to illustrate this: in the first case (with 44.1kHz), if the computer is "busy" for 2ms and cannot replenish the buffer, we don't get a dropout. in the second case (with 88.2kHz), if the computer is busy for 2ms and cannot replenish the buffer, we DO get a dropout.

    Add to this that it is about twice as computationally intense to do audio processing at 88.2kHz than at 44.1kHz. So even if you doubled the buffer to 256 samples, the chance of dropouts is still higher in the 88.2kHz case than in the 44.1kHz case.

    of course, all of this is abstracting from a bunch of things but i think this illustrates the core issue. OP, you're lying to yourself, nothing's for free
    Last edited by itskindahot; 03-19-2011 at 05:36 AM.

  10. #30
    Tech Convert
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    4

    Default

    It is simple,

    Buffer size divided by sample rate = latency
    eg:

    256 samples / 96000 Hz = 0.0026 seconds or 2.6 ms

    256 samples / 44100 Hz = 0.0058 seconds or 5.8 ms

    The bottom line is that 96KHz has significant advantage in audio quality when using Traktor and it provides much lower latency. The only disadvantage is that it has a higher CPU cost, but if you have a modern CPU and your laptop is optimised well this shouldn't make any difference in use.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •