what has possesed me to buy a macbook pro
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  1. #1
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    Default what has possesed me to buy a macbook pro

    Just bought a macbook pro got it cheap in all fairness. But i really do hate the apple interface. However the core audio drivers piss all over the windows ones and no registry to worry about.

    In all fairness I really need an understanding of all OS's for my future jobs. But that being said is it worth the money. My laptop is being fixed atm but waiting for a part. (angry mum plus glass of vimto = broken laptop).

    I just feel id like an apple laptop and it is better for audio and dont need one but i could not live without windows or linux for servers.

    PEOPLE DO NOT TURN THIS INTO A MAC VS WINDOWS THREAD ELSE THE MODS WILL SJUST SHUT IT DOWN

    my question is, is how many people that have a mac also use a pc on a daily basis whether that be for work or personal use.

  2. #2
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    I used a mac for ages for video/3d design and then windows for everything else, now with windows 7 being a lot more stable do it all on windows due to I like to be able to mess with settings as I please and ive been on windows most of my life.
    *Samsung rv 511, 8gb ram, core i5 processor* *Samsung netbook 2gb ram* *Traktor pro 2* *Traktor s4* *midi fighter spectra* *audio technica ath-m50x* *m audio trigger finger pro* *ableton* *fl studio* and a load of other random bits and pieces.... plus I like bacon yo.

  3. #3
    Tech Mentor spiz's Avatar
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    I use both Windows and OS X daily.

    I came from a heavy windows background and originally found OS X cumbersome and more difficult to use in some respects (mostly system administrative stuff), but over time got used to it.

    Both have their own shortcuts for fast browsing, folder actions, etc. all that you have to do is learn each. You will get used to the Mac OS, and may even start to like it over time. I honestly don't have a huge preference in win7 or OS X (I don't really like lion tbh).

    If you don't want to go completely without windows on the laptop, the best part is you can create a small bootcamp partition to fulfill your windows needs. The biggest daily issue I find is that I frequently hit the Apple key when I need to hit ctrl on windows and vice versa. But this is just a shortcut/keyboard thing, and easily dealt with.

  4. #4
    Tech Guru DigitalDevil's Avatar
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    I don't think asking other people about their usage will really help you understand your own position on this. I use a PC daily at work but my home PC has been in a box for months because I don't need it for anything at the moment.

  5. #5
    Tech Guru Bassline Brine's Avatar
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    I have my Macbook Pro with OSX. I completely changed over when my PC died and it wasn't worth fixing. It took me a little bit of time to learn some of the differences, but overall I've been quite happy with the change. OSX is pretty straightforward. I have basically come to understand that anything I wanted to do on the PC, I can pretty much do on the Mac, I just don't always know the commands or places to look by heart like I used to on the PC.

    Gaming I've found to be a bit of an issue, but that's to be expected. I tried using VMware to run Windows basically as an app, but the graphics drivers are bunk for that. Thinking about bootcamping... but I don't really want to dedicate so much space to something I honestly don't do that often.
    BREAKBEATS AND OTHER MUSICAL ADVENTURES
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  6. #6
    Tech Guru JonathanBlake's Avatar
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    I have a PC and my wife has a Mac - both for personal use at home. I love her Mac - its slick, sexy and fast, but I feel like a retard on it. She works better on my PC than me on her Mac. I don't use it well enough to fully appreciate it.

    Personally I prefer my PC - not because its better - because I feel at home on it.
    Last edited by JonathanBlake; 09-26-2011 at 11:51 AM.
    356 reasons why

  7. #7
    RGAS Guru Xonetacular's Avatar
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    I originally bought my mac for audio driver support. The Xone 4D ran like shit with all versions of windows and traktor, worked perfect on the mac. Since then I don't regret it at all and I was always a windows fanboy.

  8. #8
    Tech Guru mostapha's Avatar
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    I use Windows M-F at work and when helping other people with their computers. I've administered servers on OS X, several flavors of Linux, OpenSolaris, Win 2k3 and newer, and IIS.

    But, I switched from Windows to Linux years ago for personal use and never looked back. When I decided I needed to run real audio apps, I bought a Mac after realizing that it was at least based on unix and shipped with versions of GNU tools and a full shell. Everything "advanced" that I do is just easier in a shell (CLI/Terminal; specifically, I use zsh) than any other way I've tried doing it. Between what OS X comes with, Apple Developer Tools, and MacPorts, I can get just about everything done on it that I could do on Linux and more than I believe is possible on Windows without spending a lot of money.

    My Dell at work hardly sees any use other than the interface to an ERP system that doesn't have an OS X client and MS Office (just word and excel) because I'm not willing to pay for it myself and the docx export for TextEdit causes formatting issues when opened in the latest version of MS Office…and people outside of geekdom and academia don't like PDFs for reasons that continue to baffle me.

    If you're coming from the Windows world and were/are a Windows power user/sysadmin, I'd imagine that the change is weird.

    But, you mention Linux servers.

    If you can use Linux, you can use OS X. That may not hold if you've only used Ubuntu. (I'm a Gentoo fanboy and scorn Ubuntu users)

    Install quicksilver (it's free…basically it's like gnome-do that runs on OS X natively instead of running on X with a really ugly plugin interface. Pick your shell (it's under the advanced settings in the accounts pref pane…unlock and right-click on your username). And install MacPorts.

    Done.

    There are a few quicks, it doesn't follow all of the linux folder structure, and a lot of stuff is /dev is named differently. It's also not technically POSIX-compliant because of some bitchy little things to do with what actually happens when you move files around, that I think someone mentioned were due to OS X's heavy reliance on metadata. But, a lot of scripts just work. It installs with Apple builds of most GNU tools and a lot of other stuff. And it installs with sh, zsh, ksh, tcsh, and bash and will also run every other shell I've even heard about people trying…one of my friends uses fish on Lion just because it's funny.

    The biggest different I've found that actually affects my life is that the Apple build of ls doesn't respond to --classify, which means the colors I was used to just aren't there. I haven't bothered to figure out if I can build the GNU version or if it's in MacPorts because I just don't care that much. And getting used to en1 instead of eth1 for wifi.

  9. #9
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    My laptop is a black macbook, but all my school's computers happen to be windows. I grew up using windows and can still know more about it than most of my peers who use windows everyday. My favorite part about my macbook has to be expose and spaces though. Both expose and spaces make navigating my computer one fluid motion almost.

  10. #10

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    Yes there's this misconception that a OSX is a closed system but open up the terminal window and you could get access to any Berkeley Unix APIs and other constructs. Or install as much public domain code you ever wish. It's just that a majority of users purchase a Mac just to avoid doing this by default.

    I don't mind being paid to configure and write code for complex systems. But in the studio I rather make music.

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