Setting up turntable properly
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  1. #1
    Tech Mentor Ryan Leo's Avatar
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    Default Setting up turntable properly

    Hey all,

    I just purchased a pair of pdx 2000 over the holidays and I was doing some searching around the internet for articles/videos to teach myself how to properly setup my needle and all that, but I couldn't really find anything really good.

    The guy that sold me the turntables just to adjust the counter-weight until the needle doesnt skip, but that seems almost too easy when you consider skip and anti skip and if you have the needle at the right angle and all these things.

    I think I have ortofan spherical night club stylus.

    I think the other piece, whatever it is...cartridge is vestax one.


    If someone could point me in the right direction, please do so.
    DJM900||CDJ800MKII(2)||PDX 2000(2)||Yamaha HS50M(2)||Yorkville YSS2||Macbook||Traktor 2


    http://soundcloud.com/ryanleomusic/

  2. #2
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynIDWgo2lpo

    There ya go, he has GREAT tutorials on anti-skip and some other things as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg5OH View Post
    Kinda sounds like a big hiss then boom boom wacka wacka boom

  3. #3
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    no way!
    i got a pair of pdx 2000 as well, and was having the same questions!
    you saved me from making a thread.
    and thank you johnv!
    I AM A DISK JERKER

  4. #4
    Tech Guru MyUsername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnv View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynIDWgo2lpo

    There ya go, he has GREAT tutorials on anti-skip and some other things as well.
    GOOD GOD, I knew how to adjust the tonearm, but that is very well explained, great video.

  5. #5
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    Lot of great tutorials on YouTube.

  6. #6
    Tech Mentor Ryan Leo's Avatar
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    Ok,

    just to keep everything here in one spot..


    If I dont have a one sided vinyl to check anti-skate...what would you use?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIBtZ...watch_response



    Oh yeah,


    I totally understand why people coming from vinyls had such a problem with cdjs and I fully understand where these people are coming from when they say cds are cheating... haha
    DJM900||CDJ800MKII(2)||PDX 2000(2)||Yamaha HS50M(2)||Yorkville YSS2||Macbook||Traktor 2


    http://soundcloud.com/ryanleomusic/

  7. #7
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    Its true, theres a lot of small things that can go wrong with vinyl. I'm not sure what else you could use besides a blank vinyl. Thats a question for someone that's been around tables longer then I have.
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg5OH View Post
    Kinda sounds like a big hiss then boom boom wacka wacka boom

  8. #8
    Tech Guru bumtsch's Avatar
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    In a similar recent thread, a couple guys mentioned using their slipmat with the needle guard on.
    In my (limited) experience - generic felt mats, ortofon concordes with the little condom-like needle guard - it is FAR from accurate. There's literally no anti-skate setting at which this does not drift, and certainly not the setting at which it doesn't drift on blank vinyl.
    Kinda makes sense considering how different the surfaces are... maybe it does somewhat work with butter rugs... if you have the guards, try it but I wouldn't trust the results

    Bottom line - if that's available in your area,, just go crate dig at a shop and find yourself a couple of blanks (even better when the useful side has a nice tune on it). Maybe ebay or craigslist...

  9. #9
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    Hip Hop Songs

    The phonograph record player, or gramophone (from the Greek: γράμμα, gramma, "letter" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice"), is a device introduced in 1877 that has had continued common use for reproducing (playing) sound recordings, although when first developed, the phonograph was used to both record and reproduce sounds. The recordings played on such a device generally consist of wavy lines that are either scratched, engraved, or grooved onto a rotating cylinder or disc. As the cylinder or disc rotates, a needle or other similar object on the device traces the wavy lines and vibrates, reproducing sound waves.

    The phonograph was invented in 1877 by Thomas Alva Edison at his laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, USA.[1][2][3][4] On February 19, 1878, Edison was issued the first patent (U.S. patent #200,521) for the phonograph.[5] While other inventors had produced devices that could record sounds, Edison's phonograph was the first to be able to reproduce the recorded sound. (In announcing the demonstration, Scientific American noted that the non-reproducing devices that preceded Edison's had been built by Marey and Rosapelly, Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville and Barlow.)[6] Although Edison began experimenting on the phonograph using wax coated paper as a recording medium, his phonograph recorded sound onto a tinfoil sheet phonograph cylinder. Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory made several improvements in the 1880s, including the use of wax-coated cardboard cylinders, and a cutting stylus that moved from side to side in a "zig zag" pattern across the record. Then at the turn of the century, Emile Berliner initiated the transition from phonograph cylinders to gramophone records: flat, double-sided discs with a spiral groove running from the periphery to near the center. Other improvements were made throughout the years, including modifications to the turntable and its drive system, the needle and stylus, and the sound and equalization systems.

    The gramophone record was one of the dominant audio recording formats throughout much of the 20th Century. However, that status was eventually replaced by the compact disc and other digital recording formats.

  10. #10
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    Default Hip Hop Song

    The phonograph record player, or gramophone (from the Greek: γράμμα, gramma, "letter" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice"), is a device introduced in 1877 that has had continued common use for reproducing (playing) sound recordings, although when first developed, the phonograph was used to both record and reproduce sounds. The recordings played on such a device generally consist of wavy lines that are either scratched, engraved, or grooved onto a rotating cylinder or disc. As the cylinder or disc rotates, a needle or other similar object on the device traces the wavy lines and vibrates, reproducing sound waves.

    The phonograph was invented in 1877 by Thomas Alva Edison at his laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, USA.[1][2][3][4] On February 19, 1878, Edison was issued the first patent (U.S. patent #200,521) for the phonograph.[5] While other inventors had produced devices that could record sounds, Edison's phonograph was the first to be able to reproduce the recorded sound. (In announcing the demonstration, Scientific American noted that the non-reproducing devices that preceded Edison's had been built by Marey and Rosapelly, Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville and Barlow.)[6] Although Edison began experimenting on the phonograph using wax coated paper as a recording medium, his phonograph recorded sound onto a tinfoil sheet phonograph cylinder. Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory made several improvements in the 1880s, including the use of wax-coated cardboard cylinders, and a cutting stylus that moved from side to side in a "zig zag" pattern across the record. Then at the turn of the century, Emile Berliner initiated the transition from phonograph cylinders to gramophone records: flat, double-sided discs with a spiral groove running from the periphery to near the center. Other improvements were made throughout the years, including modifications to the turntable and its drive system, the needle and stylus, and the sound and equalization systems.

    The gramophone record was one of the dominant audio recording formats throughout much of the 20th Century. However, that status was eventually replaced by the compact disc and other digital recording formats.

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