Press Kits/Packs, good, bad and what to avoid
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  1. #1
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    Default Press Kits/Packs, good, bad and what to avoid

    Does any one have some advice on what's some good info to include in a press kit, as well as bad info not to include and just stuff to avoid all together? Maybe even post some links to press kits/packs that are doing it and even some who are not getting it right at all?

    Cheers!

  2. #2

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    a lot of venues i see nowadays are shunning the "physical" press kit. a lot of places/people are accepting a well-done myspace page as a form of a press kit. this is because, if all the information is filled out on the page, you have background info, names, bio, music samples, pictures, pretty much everything that would normally be in a traditional press kit.
    soundcloud.com/hpntk / soundcloud.com/freakstep
    freakstep.com / thefreakbeat.com
    me on beatport / me on djtunes
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  3. #3
    Dr. Bento BentoSan's Avatar
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    This would be a useful topic for the FAQ, if you guys come up with some helpful info on the topic ill throw this in the FAQ Thanks guys !

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    Tech Guru Damien1138's Avatar
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    Bento, go FAQ yourself sorry couldn't resist haha

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    Tech Guru Damien1138's Avatar
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    On the topic of Press kits, what's good to have in them are flyers, reviews, promotional photos, a bio, and if possible, named references (as in people who have made a name for themselves in your city/scene).

  6. #6
    DJTT Moderator bloke Karlos Santos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djhipnotikk View Post
    a lot of venues i see nowadays are shunning the "physical" press kit. a lot of places/people are accepting a well-done myspace page as a form of a press kit.
    One problem with this is that anyone can make a great Myspace and fill it full off lies and bullshit. Im dealing with such a guy at the moment who offers so many services its hilarious. He even offers a Press Release and CV service to professionally write your DJ P.R and his own Press Release has about 20 typos in it. Hes a fucking idiot.

    In UK i still think nothing works better than going into the club/bar with your mix cd and a bunch of flyers your name is on in a package and passing a few out to the manager/promoter and if your brave the DJ.
    Obviously a good Myspace is essential as a starting point. (i havent maintained mine for months)

    I think people in UK are a little tired of Myspace and Facebook .
    Whatver works though !!!

  7. #7
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    Myspace/Facebooks seems played out. I think if you have an actual website that would seem more professional, and that's something I'm already working on.

  8. #8
    Tech Guru Monika.mhz's Avatar
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    What I include in my presskits:
    Onesheet:
    The onesheet should have a short bio, contact info, basic info (genres, current gigs/residancies), notable info (are you famous?), and it should have an action shot as well as a staged 'look at me i'm a cool dj' shot. Anything else is kinda superfluous, but some things can add to it and some can detract. be careful. dont go overboard. the onesheet is probably the ONLY thing they'll keep.
    Demos:
    I always include a wide array of demos geared towards what I'm currently doing/marketing. I do a wide variety of genres, so as a result I tend to include 3-4 demos to give people a taste of what I do.
    Video Demo:
    I include a video demo "power mix." I record the same 10 minute mix in several venues I play at. I get a friend of mine to shoot the video with my camera. The mix should have 5-10 songs and really showcase your performance and skill as a DJ. I then stich the video together to give it the sensation that it's larger than life (cutting from one venue to another gives a 'dj on tour' feel) mixed with some crowd shots probably from later in the night. Again all to give a larger than life sensation. It's all promotion. The video demo has sold people on booking me in an instant.
    Portfolio:
    I mean pictures. Give them some purdy pictures of you. Show them you're marketable.
    Resume:
    Speaks for itself. You need a current DJ resume with real names/clubs/etc.

    Optional:
    Rider:
    The rider is totally optional for press packets. I never include the rider with the press packet unless it's asked for before hand.
    Flyers:
    I think it's cheesy. I never include flyers. We've all seen a flyer before. Seeing one with a DJs name on it makes no difference to me as a promoter. When people tell me they've been on a flyer before I usually just laugh. I wanna see what you can do, and your name in 12pt font on a double sided glossy does nothing for me.
    business cards
    This is something I've been thinking about. Dropping 3-5 business cards in the press kit. Give them something to put in their wallet and hand to a buddy.
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    The thing to remember is it's ALL about marketing. Where are you the most marketable? Are you a performer? Are you really really attractive? Are you super technically amazing, mr. glitch mob? Do you bring amazing gear to the table?

    Whatever it is, you find your main thing and exploit the HELL out of it. but just don't forget about the music. ^_^
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monika.mhz View Post
    What I include in my presskits:
    Onesheet:
    The onesheet should have a short bio, contact info, basic info (genres, current gigs/residancies), notable info (are you famous?), and it should have an action shot as well as a staged 'look at me i'm a cool dj' shot. Anything else is kinda superfluous, but some things can add to it and some can detract. be careful. dont go overboard. the onesheet is probably the ONLY thing they'll keep.
    Demos:
    I always include a wide array of demos geared towards what I'm currently doing/marketing. I do a wide variety of genres, so as a result I tend to include 3-4 demos to give people a taste of what I do.
    Video Demo:
    I include a video demo "power mix." I record the same 10 minute mix in several venues I play at. I get a friend of mine to shoot the video with my camera. The mix should have 5-10 songs and really showcase your performance and skill as a DJ. I then stich the video together to give it the sensation that it's larger than life (cutting from one venue to another gives a 'dj on tour' feel) mixed with some crowd shots probably from later in the night. Again all to give a larger than life sensation. It's all promotion. The video demo has sold people on booking me in an instant.
    Portfolio:
    I mean pictures. Give them some purdy pictures of you. Show them you're marketable.
    Resume:
    Speaks for itself. You need a current DJ resume with real names/clubs/etc.
    All great tips. One thing I might add is that your web presence is important. These days they're going to Google you, so make sure what shows up in their search results is what you want them to see. Of course, the most efficient way to do this is to have a website domain name that's the same as your stage name; it makes you seem more professional.

    For both your web presence and physical press kits, make sure everything is concise, clean and professional looking. Don't put anything on it that isn't relevant; they're not going to read a novel. Uniqueness also makes you stand out. Consider investing in graphic designers. That's all I can think of right now, good luck!

  10. #10
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    great tips monica & keyofgrey.
    in addition:
    press kits are a great way to show your other creative skills. don't have any? collaborate with a friend with artistic talents. nothing gimmicky, but having a standout folder/package as well as a clean design and great sounding demo cd expresses that you have invested time (and a little money) into your profession; as opposed to doing it as a hobby or just to pass time.
    a word on social sites such as myspace, facebook; although they may not be the best way to showcase your DJ prowess, they still can be a resourceful tool. if you are smart, you have used them to include your schedule, a mini-mix, gig pics, etc.,. i think most management at venues know the importance of promoting through social networks by now, if not, explain to them how you use this and that may increase your value to them as well.
    ONE SHEET
    exactly just that, a one sheet. too much text can be boring, be short concise, thesaureses (and a spell check dictionary, ahem) will be your new best friend. list a few major events or DJs you have played with, this shows you have experience. if you have a myspace, facebook, blog, or other social networking site that you use to supplement your dj ventures, do include. obviously, if your social networking site is filled with unmentionable naughtiness that you would not want to be judged by, then use your commonsense and don't include. References a plus, good words from a person you DJed with or another promoter/venue go a loong way... most of the time.
    DEMOS
    research always goes a long way too. It's alright to give a venue several demos that shows your versatility, however; if you are expressing intent to to promote a night with your style of music, then obviously do that with just one disc. Make sure your CD has your contact info printed clearly on it (along with awesome logo/artwork) AND in your mix you have audible promos with your DJ Name; cheesy example: "your in the mix with DJ Slomojo (background lasersounds and/or explosive gangsta shotgun blasts optional)"
    VIDEO DEMO
    i have never done one, but agree it could be a good selling point as well. time is def required, for editing, video capturing, sound, etc., then again, friends with these creative means can save the day.
    BUSINESS CARDS
    should be the 1st thing in your self-promo repretoire.
    WEBSITE
    get one (a free blogsite can do you justice). if you want to add more bells & whistles:
    have a few of your demos available for streaming or downloading.
    link to your facebook or myspace page. if you need instructions for website help, with embedding music, html graphics, etc., a quick youtube video search always helps.

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