Power Supply help
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  1. #1
    Tech Guru Otacon's Avatar
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    Default Power Supply help

    Well I ordered a DN-X300 discontinued 2 channel mixer from the used section of Guitar Center, and it didn't come with a power supply. I don't know where to find one, but it looks just like a computer supply chord hook up so If I grab one do you think it will work or will it blow my mixer up? Any help appreciated
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  2. #2
    Tech Guru VirtualLogic's Avatar
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    Usually the power supply is in the mixer( transformer) and it just the lead that u need. Yeah so that will work fine with a pc power lead.

  3. #3
    Tech Guru Otacon's Avatar
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    ok cool just wanted to make sure before I went out and bought one. thanks man!
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  4. #4
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    This one yeah?

    20090422131537.jpg

    If so the connector in the back of the mixer is called a RJ45. Computer networks use the same connector. However a network cable will not work for your mixer.

    You will need to order a Denon specific adaptor
    Part number is For 110V (US) AA-26 and 240V (EU and AU) AA-27

    Don't muck around with this as you may damage the mixer.
    Last edited by audiolive; 08-03-2012 at 08:28 AM.

  5. #5
    Tech Guru Otacon's Avatar
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    only thing I found was this

    http://www.d-mprodirect.com/9587043400.html

    and without pictures and such it seems alittle sketch...
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  6. #6
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    Just call Guitar Centre and get them to order one in for ya

  7. #7
    Tech Guru Otacon's Avatar
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    called Guitar Center, they dont have that adapter/part at all anymore. They gave me Denon's number....let hope i can find something
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  8. #8
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    Sounds like they are pack of lazzy kents to me. Anyway call Denon mate they'll still have them.

  9. #9
    Tech Guru Otacon's Avatar
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    well after going through like a million numbers and every division of the denondj phone line they directed me back to that website i posted above...apparently DM is the company that owns Denon
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  10. #10
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    Default Engineer answer to power supply question

    Quote Originally Posted by Otacon View Post
    Well I ordered a DN-X300 discontinued 2 channel mixer from the used section of Guitar Center, and it didn't come with a power supply. I don't know where to find one, but it looks just like a computer supply chord hook up so If I grab one do you think it will work or will it blow my mixer up? Any help appreciated
    I’m a qualified and experienced electronics engineer wanting to use a Denon DN-X300 without its original power supply. The original Denon power supply is obsolete and unavailable – part number 9587043400, and is suitable or the following models:
    DNX300
    DNX100
    DNX120
    DNX050

    The X300 is a clone of the well respected Rane 56 – according to the review here: http://www.skratchworx.com/reviews/dn-x300.php

    I’m posting the details of what is needed to re-create the power supply, with brief supporting calculations.

    The mixers ask for a 10V-0-10V RMS centre-tapped AC supply with three wires, all of which are needed.
    The main logic supply, 5V, is powered using a simple full-wave rectifier ~( see circuit )
    https://www.manualslib.com/manual/12...n-Dn-X100.html, and here: https://www.manualslib.com/download/...n-Dn-X300.html.

    Critically, the +/- 15V supplies are generated using a voltage doubler – which is why the centre tap is absolutely required. Without it, the thing just hums excessively, and the 15V rails would be greatly out of balance, meaning it will distort as well.
    The circuit mentions 10V AC, centre-tapped, as the input voltage – i.e. 10-0-10, avoiding the question of is it 10V overall, or per winding?.

    So, 10V-0-10V is the specification. I calculate that 9V-0-9V is also OK, even with low mains voltage (and is a more common transformer spec).
    12V-0-12V is too much and could exceed the input voltage range of the regulators.

    Let’s calculate for a 6-0-6 VAC transformer:
    6Vrms x 1.414 = 8.5Vpeak, rectified.
    Minus diode drop, 0.8V = 7.7V.
    This must clear maximum dropout for a 7805 regulator which is 2V, we have 700mV good margin for the 5V supply.
    As well as this, the voltage-doubled supplies must generate 15V plus the 7815 and 7915 dropouts (about 2V, they are very old parts). Doubling the 7.7V above gives us only 15.4V, whereas we need 17V to be sure the 15V regulators have enough headroom (dropout) to operate correctly.
    6-0-6 VAC transformer is not a solution.
    Similar calculations on the other voltages will prove that 9-0-9 is OK and 10-0-10 is OK also.

    The RJ45 (ethernet lead) power input is an odd choice, but so is the need for a 3-wire AC input voltage. The pinning is in the diagrams linked, basically 1+2 are one end of transformer winding, 3,4,5,6 are the centre tap, and 7+8 are the other end.
    For a 4-wire transformer output - i.e. dual windings, the most common type, winding #1 is connected to 1+2 and 3+4. Keeping the phasing correct, the second winding is 5+6 to 7+8.
    [ each secondary will be labelled similarly, like 0, 9V. 0, 9V. you connect them in this order to 1,2; 3,4; 5,6; 7,8. ]

    if in doubt, connect a bulb between your [1,2] and [7,8] connections (whilst shorting 3,4,5,6) and it should light. If not, you need to switch over either one of the windings - it does not matter which.
    Hope this helps and that someone out there uses it !

    your veritable Captain.
    Bonkers.

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