Beginner DJ, few questions
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    327

    Default Beginner DJ, few questions

    Hi, hope everyone's having a good day and positive vibes throughout the coming week!

    I've just received a budget to buy my first mixing equipment, and I've just got a few questions as I'm a bit lost on how I should proceed.

    My budget is around 500-600, and my original plan was to buy a midi controller and headphones:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...&condition=new - the controller

    http://www.juno.co.uk/products/299532-01.htm - the headphones

    My concern is that, is it worth getting a midi controller instead of a CDJ? From what I've gathered, CDJ provides a more suitable "clubbing" environment, and it's the real deal, rather then a midi controller connected to a laptop. It also seems like midi controllers are somewhat limited? In terms of progression, it seems like midi controllers are only useful to learn the basics, not to progress onto bigger gigs and events.

    I'm not looking to DJ/produce as a hobby, I'm looking to progress as far as I can as I simply love music.

    What are the essential equipments required for Djing? Aside from speakers and mics, only speaking in terms of the core software required.

    I've heard that clubs don't generally accept a DJ that uses a controller, is this true? If so, are most clubs expecting a CDJ?

    Basically my question is;

    I really don't want to spend 500 dollars on an equipment which is only suitable for learning the basics, I'm looking to buy equipment which is suitable for gigs and bigger events, that I can progress with it in a long term basis.


    I'm just so ecstatic and excited to start learning and dedicate the majority of my time for this beautiful art Any help would be much appreciated!

  2. #2
    Tech Guru squidot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    803

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DemiAlex View Post
    My concern is that, is it worth getting a midi controller instead of a CDJ? From what I've gathered, CDJ provides a more suitable "clubbing" environment, and it's the real deal, rather then a midi controller connected to a laptop. It also seems like midi controllers are somewhat limited? In terms of progression, it seems like midi controllers are only useful to learn the basics, not to progress onto bigger gigs and events.
    sure it's worth it and there are big name djs who use x1s and a mixers when djing in clubs. i know other semi famous djs who use all in one controllers as well. the standard install in a large club will probably be high end cdjs, 900 or 2000 (maybe the 2000 nexus here real quick) with a djm 900 or 800/850. smaller venues may have lesser end pioneer gear. in the states there is almost always a serato box to use alongside the cdjs with your laptop. with that said you are most likely YEARS away from gigging in big clubs, if you ever get the shot. not to sound negative but it's unlikely you will get your wings and just jump right into big gigs in the immediate future, so a controller is fine to learn and get smaller gigs at house parties and bars to start. if you can start making money from it then upgrade your gear while selling your old gear.

    I'm not looking to DJ/produce as a hobby, I'm looking to progress as far as I can as I simply love music.
    well, a lot of people get into djing with this exact thought and then start only to find out it's really not their thing. the only way to find out is to give it a go. i hope you do continue on if you truly love it. in my opinion you should do that with as little money as possible. try out the software demos of traktor, ableton, vdj, and serato using your keyboard & mouse and see what you think about them.

    What are the essential equipments required for Djing? Aside from speakers and mics, only speaking in terms of the core software required.
    that really depends on how you want to dj for now. if you want to use a controller you will need a laptop and software. or you can go with cheaper cdjs and mixers. you will also need monitors (or even a home stereo system), headphones and cables to hook it all up. also, a soundcard. i don't find a mic necessary for me personally but i suppose it depends on how much you want to talk over your mix. be careful with this though...

    I've heard that clubs don't generally accept a DJ that uses a controller, is this true? If so, are most clubs expecting a CDJ?
    depends on the club and who you are. do you think a club is going to turn down tiesto if he wanted to use a controller? nope. as stated above many clubs in the states will have cdjs installed as the standard.

    Basically my question is;

    I really don't want to spend 500 dollars on an equipment which is only suitable for learning the basics, I'm looking to buy equipment which is suitable for gigs and bigger events, that I can progress with it in a long term basis.
    if you have club level cdjs in mind then your going to need to add another 0 (plus some) onto the end of that. in my opinion a controller is a perfectly suitable entry level piece of gear that you can learn on and get smaller gigs with. progression is great but you need to learn the basics first and a controller is perfect for that. if you have $5000+ to get into some cdjs with a pio mixer for your first setup, by all means go for it, but they are not really going to make you any better at being a dj than a controller will. it would also be a shame to spend that much to realize you aren't that into djing.

    I'm just so ecstatic and excited to start learning and dedicate the majority of my time for this beautiful art Any help would be much appreciated!
    good luck and i hope you end up loving it as much as most of the rest of us. it takes a lot of time and work to get everything the way you like it and you may go through a few setups before you find your magic buttons. i've been through technics, vinyl, cdjs, and finally onto controllers and i think they all have their place and positives. i still enjoy using them all at certain times. you just have to experiment. i've spent many years digging for music and countless hours, sorting, organizing and tagging my collection.

    do some research, get some gear, and practice as much as you can. record every set you do so you can listen back, learn from your mistakes, and remember your triumphs. have fun!
    Last edited by squidot; 09-18-2012 at 12:24 AM.
    tsp 2.5 | vci-400 ege | mfspectra | kontrol x1s | rokit 8s (ferrari grey) | krk 10 sub | audio 8
    hp dv6 - i5 - 8gb | maschine | mpk49 | apc40 | rokit 5s | technics sl-1200mk3ds | cdj100s
    thread of free music

  3. #3
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Wollongong, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    665

    Default

    ^ Great advice there.

    A cheap controller is great for beginners, the learning curve is pretty quick and it's in-expensive. Down the track though if you really enjoy it and would like to start gigging consider at least getting some cheap direct drive turntables and some real vinyl and time code to practice beat matching on before you start trying to get gigs. Knowing how to beat match by ear is a skill every DJ should learn, and if you can beat match with some TT's CDJ's are really easy.

  4. #4
    Tech Guru DJDoubleYou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Hyperspace
    Posts
    1,176

    Default

    actually you can do far more with an S4 than with a set of 2000's. let's just say that everything you can do with the 2000's is just as easy and possible with an controller
    DN-X1600 | 2x X1 MKI | APC 20 | MC-505 | MF Pro & Spectra | Kontrol S4 MKI | XBoard 49

  5. #5
    DJTT Mapping Ninja Moderator Stewe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    MIDI
    Posts
    7,342

    Default

    If you're beginner then pick up some cheaper controller and start to practice from there... Choose software you like the most, give it some, use it and as time will pass you'll know is that what really suits your workflow. Good thing around controllers are mappings that make things a lot easier and flexible when you dig into programing unit in the way you like and bring some elements in to mix that some of CDJs aren't designed for.

  6. #6
    Tech Mentor Lilac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    436

    Default

    Mixtrack and Headphones are a very very good way to get the basics down

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stewe View Post
    If you're beginner then pick up some cheaper controller and start to practice from there...
    and

    i think you should get the Denon MC 2000. It comes with Serato Intro which will let you learn Seratos interface.

    It's $299 and the full version software is free. In my opinion it's the highest quality controller and software combination for the price.

    Please DO NOT spend $200 on headphones. Headphones do not make you a better DJ. My headphones were $59 (Sennheiser HD205) and I've had them for 6 years.

    Plus you have to remember that this is technology. Just like cellphones, it keeps improving and the midi controllers and CDJ's from 4 years ago are considered out dated.

    >
    Last edited by loverocket; 09-18-2012 at 12:48 PM.

  8. #8
    DJTT Mapping Ninja Moderator Stewe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    MIDI
    Posts
    7,342

    Default

    Denon MC 3000 is build like a tenk, for beginner it's more then good start. Stand alone mixer and audio interface all in one.

  9. #9
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Wow, thanks everyone for answering my questions! Definitely feel a lot more comfortable in regards to what I should purchase.

    The Denon MC 2000 looks like the perfect beginners controller, definately going to check it out on Ebay as well as the S2.

    I thought having good studio headphones is absolutely essential? Doesn't it provide a more clearer sound compared to other headphones which enables you to distort the sound in a more technical manner?

    Also, if I my primary goal was to become a resident at a club (and yes, I'm well aware of the amount of work and dedication it'll require to reach that level), wouldn't I be better off learning from using a CDJ instead of a controller? Or does using a controller over time give you a basic sense on how to use a CDJ?

    Last question in regards to syncing and auto syncing, is this considered a "cheap" method compared to manually beat matching? What is the most effective way in learning how to manually match bpms?

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stewe View Post
    Denon MC 3000 is build like a tenk, for beginner it's more then good start. Stand alone mixer and audio interface all in one.
    yeah sorry. I meant the Denon MC 2000. I agree the MC 3000 is amazing. But, it's $500 and it comes with Virtual DJ LE.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •