What effect does EDM culture have on London clubland? Article
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  1. #1
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    Default What effect does EDM culture have on London clubland? Article

    http://www.spoonfed.co.uk/spooners/t...clubland-7270/

    Just reigniting done to death debate no doubt, but an interesting read nonetheless. The Legend that is Terry Farley shared on FB (sorry for the name drop )

    Thoughts? Personally I think it's a well reasoned and accurate piece.
    20+ years man & boy, working the platters that matter. D3EP DJ.

  2. #2
    Jack Bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by backtothefront View Post
    Thoughts?
    It's not often I say this but I agree 100% with that blog, it's pretty much exactly my view on all this EDM crap - This horrible dayglo McDonalds music will fade eventually and people into real house/techno will just keep on keeping on like we've always done.

    When I started djing house music wasn't considered to be cutting edge and fashionable (late 90s), I've been through two revivals since then (I remember when there were about 15 records each weekly in the deep house and tech house sections on Juno) and it's made fuck all difference to what I buy and what I play.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Bastard View Post
    It's not often I say this but I agree 100% with that blog, it's pretty much exactly my view on all this EDM crap - This horrible dayglo McDonalds music will fade eventually and people into real house/techno will just keep on keeping on like we've always done.

    When I started djing house music wasn't considered to be cutting edge and fashionable (late 90s), I've been through two revivals since then (I remember when there were about 15 records each weekly in the deep house and tech house sections on Juno) and it's made fuck all difference to what I buy and what I play.
    Thanks for replying Jack, twas feeling a little lonely with just virtual tumbleweed for company

    Yep, totally with you. I was pleased to see an article properly tackling this 'EDM' bollocks but then thought, actually it hasn't changed what I do and it will fade - doesn't stop it grating me in the meantime though.
    20+ years man & boy, working the platters that matter. D3EP DJ.

  4. #4
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    As much as I despise the current pop EDM, I do believe it's a good thing. Once it all fades out and most fans move on to whatever the new fad is, those left behind will look deeper into the scene and end up fueling the more 'underground' side of house. As much as most of us hate pop, we need it at the same time.

  5. #5
    Jack Bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by JZed View Post
    As much as most of us hate pop, we need it at the same time.
    Au contraire imo.

    (a) I really like pop music, there's a lot to be said for a catchy tune and a 3 minute pop song.

    but

    (b) Dance music doesn't need it in any way, shape or form, in fact acceptance of dance trends within the mainstream has generally meant the death knell creatively for whatever is being accepted, eg, disco in the late 70s and early 80s, trance in the late 90s.

    My love of pop music and my love of dance music have always been mutually exclusive, I didn't get into one through the other and I don't think a lot of other people did either.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Bastard View Post
    Au contraire imo.

    (a) I really like pop music, there's a lot to be said for a catchy tune and a 3 minute pop song.
    Shouldn't have said most of us, rather should have said "I"

    (b) Dance music doesn't need it in any way, shape or form, in fact acceptance of dance trends within the mainstream has generally meant the death knell creatively for whatever is being accepted, eg, disco in the late 70s and early 80s, trance in the late 90s.

    My love of pop music and my love of dance music have always been mutually exclusive, I didn't get into one through the other and I don't think a lot of other people did either.
    I agree and I don't. It's inevitable for something with a strong underground movement to eventually become popular, but I still think we need it. It brings in change, Trance got so popular that a lot of people got tired of it. Same thing happens in other genres of music as well. In the 1980s metal was huge, but then it got so big and so over the top cheese that people started to haaate it, and that brought in change. The same thing just happened to hip hop, it enjoyed over a decade of mainstream popularity until in the last few years it just got so over the top and ridiculous that people got tired of it, and now we have mainstream EDM.

    I hope that makes sense, not saying you're wrong or I'm right it's just my opinion.

  7. #7
    Jack Bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by JZed View Post
    I hope that makes sense, not saying you're wrong or I'm right it's just my opinion.
    Yeah it does mate. Time for nice, healthy and natural wildfire I reckon.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Bastard View Post
    Yeah it does mate. Time for nice, healthy and natural wildfire I reckon.

    I hear that! I'm hoping when the glitz and glam fades out, we see a nice and dark movement following it up.

  9. #9
    Jack Bastard
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    The trick is just to go out and make it happen regardless of whatever fashion says. DIY it motherfuckers, that's the beauty of dance music It makes me laugh when I see people on here advising people to get the latest and greatest macbook or controller or whatever, like the originators of house or techno had state of the art kit

    You can put on a great party with a set of belt drives, a 2 channel mixer with no eq, a couple of spots, a mirrorball and home-made backdrops, a lot of folks forget this.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Bastard View Post
    The trick is just to go out and make it happen regardless of whatever fashion says. DIY it motherfuckers, that's the beauty of dance music It makes me laugh when I see people on here advising people to get the latest and greatest macbook or controller or whatever, like the originators of house or techno had state of the art kit

    You can put on a great party with a set of belt drives, a 2 channel mixer with no eq, a couple of spots, a mirrorball and home-made backdrops, a lot of folks forget this.
    I hear that man! Simplicity is the best. You don't need a laptop with 10 midi controllers (even though that's cool too) to make good music and hold a good party.
    The best parties (that I've been to) are the ones in a simple smaller room club, with dark lighting and a sound system that blows your face off.

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