Beginner trying to learn to set up bookshelf speakers
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  1. #1
    Tech Wizard
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    Jul 2011
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    Default Beginner trying to learn to set up bookshelf speakers

    Hey i am completely new to this.

    I have done some research and have learned that i need to buy an Amp and unpowered speakers (because powered speakers are expensive and not modular).

    I want to try and get a 2.1 system set up, just a simple way to introduce myself to audio systems but i am confused on which amp to get for a 2.1 system.

    I am trying to do this as budget as possible because it's just a beginner project, if i get more knowledgable i will consider buying a better amp and speaker system.

    I wondering if it is possible to set up a 2.1 system with either this or this amplifier and if so how would i do it? What kind of wiring should i set up?

    If not what kind of amplifier do i need for setting up a 2.1 system (and furthermore an x.1 system)?

    My budget for the entire project is about $75, i'm not looking for pristine sound, but i do want it to be decently loud and without too much noise.

    So what information can you give to a complete beginner?

  2. #2
    Tech Guru Patch's Avatar
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    This will be fine - it has a built in amp:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cyber-Acoust...item43b51836e0

    Perfect for the beginner. You don't need to spend a fortune getting started. These will do you fine while you're starting out.
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  3. #3
    Tech Wizard
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patch View Post
    This will be fine - it has a built in amp:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cyber-Acoust...item43b51836e0

    Perfect for the beginner. You don't need to spend a fortune getting started. These will do you fine while you're starting out.
    Thanks for the reply!

    Are you sure I shouldn't go with a setup that separates the amp from the speakers? I am trying to learn about audio setups and I feel I should try to do it like the big boys . Also would be nice to have a modular setup so if I buy a better amp or speakers I could still use the old ones. I am probably going to save up for a 5.1 or 7.1 amp one day and would like the experience of setting up 2.1 amp system. You are definitely right about not spending a fortune though, but there are cheap amps out there and my local thrift shop always has underpowered speakers for cheap (and I'm sure i can find cheap unpowered speakers online too). I guess I just really want the experience of setting up an amp with unpowered speakers because I have never done it before.
    Last edited by silman; 11-25-2012 at 01:01 PM. Reason: i

  4. #4
    Tech Mentor
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    $75?

    Go find a used receiver and a pair of old-school 3-way house speakers.

  5. #5
    Tech Wizard
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    I would go and buy some decent powered speakers and then save up for a subwoofer that has a built in crossover. The big boys as you put it don't mess with speakers that have passive crossovers. Here's a little audio lesson for you...

    - Almost all speakers are comprised of woofers and tweeters and need some sort of crossover to separate the highs and lows in to their appropriate speaker.

    - In the case of a passive crossover where the speaker is powered by an outboard amp, the crossover is built in to the speaker and the amp drives both the highs and lows. The internal crossover is inefficient and unless it is quite expensive, creates all kinds of issues with the sound.

    - In the case of a powered speaker, there are typically separate amps driving the highs and lows and the crossover is active and separates the sounds before it gets to the amps. This is the best way to go. If you insert the crossover before the amps, there is no efficiency loss and the amps can be smaller and much more efficient.

    - The big boys use active crossovers in the racks and power their high, mid and bass cabinets independently and send those amps just highs mids or lows after the active crossover.

    - When you're ready, buy a subwoofer that has a full range input and high freq output.

  6. #6
    Tech Wizard
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    Nov 2012
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    If you're only looking to spend $75 (& really need a sub) then just buy some 2.1 PC speakers.

    My question would be - Why do you need a subwoofer when you have such a tight budget?

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