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  1. #1
    Tech Convert
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16

    Default Technics SL-1210MK2 motor

    Hi everyone

    a month ago, i bought a pair of 2nd hand Technics and ditched my Synq xtrm-1's (OEM turntable).
    Though i am very pleased with the technics i feel like i was able to beatmatch more precisely with the Synq's.
    So i started testing and i think the problem lies within the motor of the technics.
    When i beatmach and the bpm rate of both records is the same, i slow the record down or speed it up by gently touching the platter.
    When i'm using a timecode setup, the phase meter of traktor shows when both songs are perfectly in phase.
    So, with my Synq's, when i slightly touch the platter, there's a permanent change in the phase.
    But when i slightly touch the platter of my technics, the phase changes.. and jumps back to where it was when i release the platter. It's like the technics motor does an effort to make up the phase change i did!
    I made a video to show you: just take a close look to the phase meter of traktor!



    Now i wonder. Is something wrong with my technics turntable or is that just how a technics behaves?
    As i mentioned before i bought them second hand, but they were almost mint when i bought them so i wouldn't expect something is wrong with them.
    This is how they look. (please ignore my panther pillows)

    Technics SL-1210MK2.jpg

  2. #2
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    South Coast, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    531

    Default

    Hey mate that's the quartz lock on the deck trying to keep the pitch constant, it doesn't look faulty to me.

    The 1200/10s have a voltage system (quartz lock) that try's to keep the platter locked at a constant speed to reduce pitch fluctuation/wow and flutter, so when you slow the platter with your finger the motor speeds up to correct itself.

    There is a mod to remove the quartz lock and make it like your old decks, but I would say keep it stock standard and you will get used to it. Un-modded techs are smooth as butter once you get the feel right and having modded decks and then jumping on a stock set somewhere else might throw you off a bit.

  3. #3

    Default

    Ah, no problems with your turntable at all

    With a 1210 I find it is better to apply pressure progressively, and to be very smooth.

    After bit of conditioning you will get a feel for the point where it will cause a change to the phase. The same applies when nudging forwards, a quick delicate nudge will not affect the phase, but turning the label (or grabbing the spindle) and progressive increasing speed will when you find that point.

    I have problems using other turntables that I'm stopping the platter entirely as I''m so accustomed to the strong motor with 1210s.

    For precise movements, the record can be slowed by placing your finger on the edge of the record and giving it a light press, or placing your finger in the centre of the record just next to the label. The applied pressure using this method depends on your slipmats and how warped the vinyl is.

  4. #4
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    124

    Default

    this is normal, it's called the Motor fighting the mix due to the quartz lock. Don't mod your tables tho, just get used to it.

  5. #5
    Tech Convert
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Haha.. Motor fighting the mix.. i didn't expect that as an answer . I never heard of it.
    I'm surely not going to mod my precious technics. Getting used to it is the best solution i think.
    So here's my next question: the technics motor is quartz driven, but an OEM motor is as well. Then why is there no Motor-fighting-mix thing with the OEM's?

  6. #6
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    124

    Default

    I believe the technics Motor is different from all the other OEM tables, if I'm not mistaken. What I definately know tho is that the technics uses a Phase detection system of some sorts that makes it speed up again if you slow the platter down manually unless you slow it down a lot until it "switches" into the next Phase, which might slow down the song way too much. The specifics are not really that important, important is how to deal with it.

    A good technique for making very fine pitch bend adjustments is, instead of brushing the platter with your Finger, gentily brushing the label on the record to slow it down, or gently pushing it.

    OR you can use the pitch control and ride the pitch

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