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  1. #1
    Tech Guru Bassline Brine's Avatar
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    Default Concorde stylus recommendations?

    I've been running with my Ortofon Concorde Elektro's for a few (well maybe more than just a few years now) and I still really like them, but they are getting beat up. I'm on my last stylus on them, and have been debating buying replacement stylus, or maybe trying something else out.

    As I'm making more of a transition from time-code to pure vinyl, I was wondering if anyone had some recommendations that would be something that would be pretty good with both for tracking, and then also sound solid with the vinyl.

    I mostly spin breaks and a little dnb (and a lot of other random stuff for fun - I just don't play it publically) and I'm teaching myself to scratch (albeit slowly). I MUCH prefer the concorde style carts as it's just what I'm used to and I like how it's much easier to see the groove on the records.

    Stick with what I've got currently? Move to something different?

    Thanks in advance!

    EDIT: I have looked extensively into the M44-7's and they are a solid option, and probably what I'd go with if I didn't stick with the concorde style.
    Technics SL-1200 MK2 (x2)
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  2. #2
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    Im a big time Ortofon fanboy...ive been using the DJ-S concords for longer than i care to mention...since 2005/6 lol before those it was the old faithful Stanton 500ALs
    Traktor Scratch Pro 2.6.3, MBP 13", iPad 2 & TouchOSC, Allen & Heath Xone 1D, Pioneer DJM900, Pioneer CDJ800 x2, Technics SL1210MK2 x2, Korg MiniKP, Korg Monotron, Korg Monotron Duo

  3. #3
    Tech Mentor
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    Shure Whitelabels aren't quite concorde but they're my recommendation as they sound good, track well on a light setting for low record wear, look cool , have a metal handle that won't snap off (my no1 complaint about concordes), and the replacement styli are cheap so it adds up financially after a while too.

  4. #4
    Tech Mentor matrick's Avatar
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    I would stick with the Elektro. Good tracking and decent output volume make it ideal for your style of music. If you want to upgrade to another concorde then the S-120 is the pinnacle.

  5. #5
    Tech Wizard
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    I've had Elektros for some 5 years now.

    I chose them for the sound and tracking ability. Other contenders were the Nightclub E mk2 (not so great for rewinds and energetic back cuing!) and the Shure M447 (I find the sound a bit harsh and fatiguing for long periods)

    It was a really close call between the Elektros and the 447s, but I'm confident I made the right choice.

    I play drum and bass and was playing vinyl when I bought my Concordes, but have since moved onto Traktor, 6 per tune just doesn't do it for me anymore!

    I actually tried the Shure 44G as well but found the tracking weight too light (I got some skips when cuing). I think the Whitelabels track at the same weight so may suffer the same issue.

    4.5g on the Elektros works well for me!

    I'd just stick with what you have - buy some new styli though as you'll notice the difference in the high frequencies, I used to chage mine every 6 months when I was DJing every day.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by olisharp View Post

    4.5g on the Elektros works well for me!
    Seriously 4.5g?

    That may be OK when your just spinning traktor vinyl, but if you want actual records to last I wouldn't want to run that heavy.

    I'd personally say Whitelabels or M44G, but then again I don't like ortofons.
    Technics 1210 MK2 x 2 / A&H Xone:22 / Shure M35S / Urbanears Zinken / Mukatsuku Record Weights x 2 / Vinyl

    iMac / Ableton Live 8 / Reason / Akai EIE Pro / KRK Rokit RP5 G2 / Maschine Mikro MK1 / NI Kontrol X1 MK1 / Akai APC 20 / Novation Remote 25sl Compact

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by amadeus View Post
    Seriously 4.5g?
    .
    Yes, seriously.

    Through necessity rather than preference. Good tracking is a higher priority than record wear for me. I just got fed up with jumping needles - not a good look when you're playing in a club!

    Just out of interest, what genre are your records? Drum & Bass and Breaks records are almost all at 45rpm, perhaps if your records are mostly 33rpm then undulations in the surface pose less of a tracking problem for you?

    I've noticed that pressing quality does vary from genre to genre. Sales volumes are relatively low in Drum and Bass (even lower in Breaks) so records are often pressed on the cheap. Very few of my records are beautifully pressed 180g: most are a bit bumpy!

    In an ideal world I could use a lower tracking force (and record weights!) but I can't exclude a record from my set just because the pressing has an imperfection. Good tracking (no jumping needles) is a higher priority for me than the marginal increase in record wear, so increasing the tracking force is the most viable option for me. Through experimentation I've found that 4.5g strikes a good balance.

    I can't say I've encountered any perceptible increase in record wear due to this tracking force either. I even bought 2 copies of a few limited edition records because I was worried about wear and tear and wanted a mint condition copy. I've done back to back listening with a used copy, and even went as far as to record them into Ableton and compare with a spectrum analyser. I'm not saying record wear hasn't occurred, but using this tracking force with this stylus has certainly not destroyed my records.

    When I first tried a Shure 44G at the recommended 2g on a record with a small bump at the edge, it actually just jumped straight up. This wasn't due to excessive centrifugal force either, just the upward acceleration from the bump. I was well and truly sucked in by the marketing hype, and regretted not getting the M447 instead.

    Some more advice for the OP as a newcomer to vinyl:
    *Avoid touching your records (the grooves)
    This may seem odd - how are you supposed to DJ, right? When you take them out of the sleeve, handle by the edges or the label in the middle, and when you're cuing up the track have your finger right on the edge, or if you need to do lots of fast forwarding, touch the label.

    *When you take them off the turntable (again, pick up by the edges) put them straight back in the sleeve so they don't get scratched or gather dust.

    * Keep them nice and clean. Stanton do a really good kit with a brush and cleaning solution.

    * Store them vertically and away from radiators. If you stack them horizontally they might warp.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by olisharp View Post
    Yes, seriously.

    Through necessity rather than preference. Good tracking is a higher priority than record wear for me. I just got fed up with jumping needles - not a good look when you're playing in a club!

    Just out of interest, what genre are your records? Drum & Bass and Breaks records are almost all at 45rpm, perhaps if your records are mostly 33rpm then undulations in the surface pose less of a tracking problem for you?

    I've noticed that pressing quality does vary from genre to genre. Sales volumes are relatively low in Drum and Bass (even lower in Breaks) so records are often pressed on the cheap. Very few of my records are beautifully pressed 180g: most are a bit bumpy!

    In an ideal world I could use a lower tracking force (and record weights!) but I can't exclude a record from my set just because the pressing has an imperfection. Good tracking (no jumping needles) is a higher priority for me than the marginal increase in record wear, so increasing the tracking force is the most viable option for me. Through experimentation I've found that 4.5g strikes a good balance.

    I can't say I've encountered any perceptible increase in record wear due to this tracking force either. I even bought 2 copies of a few limited edition records because I was worried about wear and tear and wanted a mint condition copy. I've done back to back listening with a used copy, and even went as far as to record them into Ableton and compare with a spectrum analyser. I'm not saying record wear hasn't occurred, but using this tracking force with this stylus has certainly not destroyed my records.

    When I first tried a Shure 44G at the recommended 2g on a record with a small bump at the edge, it actually just jumped straight up. This wasn't due to excessive centrifugal force either, just the upward acceleration from the bump. I was well and truly sucked in by the marketing hype, and regretted not getting the M447 instead.

    Some more advice for the OP as a newcomer to vinyl:
    *Avoid touching your records (the grooves)
    This may seem odd - how are you supposed to DJ, right? When you take them out of the sleeve, handle by the edges or the label in the middle, and when you're cuing up the track have your finger right on the edge, or if you need to do lots of fast forwarding, touch the label.

    *When you take them off the turntable (again, pick up by the edges) put them straight back in the sleeve so they don't get scratched or gather dust.

    * Keep them nice and clean. Stanton do a really good kit with a brush and cleaning solution.

    * Store them vertically and away from radiators. If you stack them horizontally they might warp.

    The majority are House & Techno, and quality still varies but I have to say it's been slightly better recently.
    Obviously dependant on release and amount of tracks some are cut at 33 some at 45.

    I don't think I've noticed my carts handling 33/45 differently, but then again I don't really look out for it. Loud cuts occasionally cause issue's but I think I maybe have one or two records that do.

    I run mine at 3grams, which is the lowest recommended weight, and I still use that in a club, I do use record weights too though. A friend of mine hates them purely because he's a heavy handed bafoon, and he can't cue up a record with them.

    I do prefer the sound of Shure carts, they just have that edge over Ortofon, but thats just personal preference. I do run an Ortofon on my Hi Fi deck though, which I have to say sounds lovely, but that deck doesn't see any House or Techno on it.


    Good vinyl advice at the bottom, OP take note.
    Technics 1210 MK2 x 2 / A&H Xone:22 / Shure M35S / Urbanears Zinken / Mukatsuku Record Weights x 2 / Vinyl

    iMac / Ableton Live 8 / Reason / Akai EIE Pro / KRK Rokit RP5 G2 / Maschine Mikro MK1 / NI Kontrol X1 MK1 / Akai APC 20 / Novation Remote 25sl Compact

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