[studio] headphones for composing/mixing/mastering dance music
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Tech Convert
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    8

    Default [studio] headphones for composing/mixing/mastering dance music

    Hei Ho!

    First of all I would like to share with you my current situation, so you can understand why Im looking for a pair of new Headphones: I have a pair of Studio-Monitors, but sadly its impossible to mix on them (especially at night), because the neighbours house is very next to the room where Im in. ( Naaaah, I cant switch the room:P)

    So I wanted the opinion of you guys:

    1.) Is it possible to archive a great mix, more precisely, a great/professional result, by just mixing with headphones?

    2.) I already own a pair of headphones, the V-Moda Crossfade M-100s
    Do you think theyre good enough for producing Electronic Dance Music?

    I would really appreciate it, if sb. could give me the pros and cons on producing Dance music with headphones
    and on producing with the V-Modas. And if theres anything, where I shoudl be careful - just tell me
    (Im not searching headphones for a Vocal-Booth or sth., just for a decent pair of Studio Reference Headphones)


    Thank you very much.
    Much Love.


    TNG

  2. #2

    Default

    for studio reference i like my sennheiser HD25.

    what it really comes down to is knowing the characteristic sound of your headphones vs the rest of the world and that comes through just using them a lot. when a mix sounds a certain way in your phones, you will start to know how its going to sound on your car system vs your ipod vs your home monitors , from constantly testing tracks on all available sources.


    heres a pretty good breakdown of some popular phones:

    http://www.wirerealm.com/guides/top-...dio-headphones
    Traktor/Ableton /Komplete /MBP OSX el capitan

    http://www.soundcloud.com/deejaesnafu

  3. #3
    Tech Convert
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Hi snafu,

    thanks very much for your answer!
    A good friend of mine owns the HD25s and theyre awesome!
    But the M-100s will hopefully do well!
    At this point its important for me to get my Audio Interface. Already waiting two weeks for the Focusrite Forte.
    Until its there I will sleep in my car,

    I would really appreciate it, if there were more opinions on Producing with headphones. So just let me know what youve experienced so far.


    I wish everyone a wonderful and productive weekend.
    Keep it up!

    TNG

  4. #4
    Tech Guru Tarekith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Luxembourg
    Posts
    889

    Default

    It can be done, but it's not as easy as mixing on good speakers IMVHO. But, if you're willing to spend enough time taking your mixes to other listening environments to see how well everything is translating, and then making adjustments, you can definitely work in the cans. Like anything, it's going to take time, and the harder you make it on yourself by not getting the proper gear, the longer it will take.

    I'd recommend the Focal Spirit Pro's myself, those are the best all around studio headphones I've used that won't drive everyone around you crazy since they're not open-backed.

  5. #5
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    69

    Default

    You can indeed produce on headphones, though as already suggested it's not as easy as using speakers, especially for things like spacial placement (panning).

    You'll find it really helpful to get to know a good spectrum analyzer too, such as Voxengo Span, which is free. Listen to lots of commercial songs that you like and want to emulate through your headphones, watch the spectrum analyzer, and whilst you're producing constantly A/B your tune with 2 or 3 commercial tracks.

    When producing in headphones it's important to take regular breaks too. It's easy to get carried away and crank up the volume - this will fatigue your ears and alter your perception of how things should sound.

    If you have bags of cash the Audeze LCDs are amongst the best headphones on the market and are probably better than most monitors at the same price point!

    https://www.audeze.com/products/headphones/lcd-3
    Last edited by olisharp; 04-23-2015 at 12:01 PM.

  6. #6
    Tech Guru ImNotDedYet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,642

    Default

    I've heard great things about the Focal Spirit Pro's.

    I don't mix solely on headphones, in fact, I rarely use headphones other than to check panning these days, but I love my Beyerdynamic DT-880's. They're semi-open so others in the room will be able to hear, and you'll also hear external noise. But, very good, pretty flat headphones.

    As others have said, you have to get used to your headphones, or monitors for that matter and how things translate away from them.
    2 x Technics 1210 MKII, Pioneer-DJM 900 Nexus, Traktor Scratch Pro, NI F1,
    Ableton Live 9.6 Suite, Ableton Push, Studio One 3, Moog Sub37, Roland Alpha Juno 2, Korg MS-20 Mini, Yamaha TG-77, TR-8, Rhodes MKI Stage, Wurlitzer 200a, couple pedals, couple amps, lots of software and a freakin iPad

  7. #7
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1

    Default M50x pretty matches up

    I've been lately falling in love with M50x for my monitoring purposes. The isolation with these headphones is excellent with no coloring. I would highly recommend it to anyone starting out mixing with headphones.

    Here are some of the best studio headphones I came across with a quick Google.

    1. Sony MDR7520 Professional Studio Headphones

    2. Audio-Technica ATH-M50x

    3. Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO

    (source)

  8. #8
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    32

    Default

    ATH-M50x!

  9. #9
    Tech Guru deevey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    From Ireland Living in Manila: Philippines :D
    Posts
    3,675

    Default

    Mixing, yes, but definitely not mastering by a long shot.

    Ear fatigue sets in pretty fast though and you can end up changing things around badly when your ears start "blocking out" certain frequencies over a long session.

    +1 on the Sony 7506's - Comfortable as hell and reasonably neutral. More subtle, but far reaching low end which is far less tiring IMHO than the constant "Umph" of HD25's.

  10. #10
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1

    Default

    For mixing, sound quality is your number one priority. For this, I would recommend an open-back headphone. Check this helpful article out:

    Basically, the Sennheiser 600 HD (or even 650) or AKG 240 (if your more on a budget) are solid picks.
    Last edited by theheadphoneguy; 10-15-2018 at 08:17 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •