Volume Levels on Pioneer Mixers
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  1. #1
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    Question Volume Levels on Pioneer Mixers

    Dear Community,

    I have a question about the master volume levels on a Pioneer 750-K mixer while mixing on 2 channels via CDJ's 2000NXS.
    In the past I often noticed that when just one channel is actively playing music from one CDJ the master volume level is always stable on -5 (green). Sometimes when I'm bringing in the next song on another channel and even cutting the mids a bit to let's say 10 o'clock the master volume goes up to 0 or +1. For me the mix doesn't sound that loud but I'm afraid I'm doing something wrong here or the songs are not matching that great right? (always mixing in key).

    I'm trying to improve my transition skills at the moment and this is something I'm very interested in for a long time.
    Could somebody of you who is more experienced with mixing on Pioneer equipment than me maybe answer my question if this behaviour is normal or if I'm doing something wrong here?

    Thanks in advance & best regards!

  2. #2
    Tech Guru SlayForMoney's Avatar
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    Yes, the sum of two channels playing on the same level will produce a higher level on the master. How much depends on the songs (newer productions are loud even in mid/high range) and your ability to notice it depends on the resolution on the mixer's VU meters (on mine each LED is 3db).

    One part of DJ's is learning how to blend/transition between the two without bumping the master volume noticeably. That's why EQ's are there, that's why we move faders in rhythm of the songs and avoid blasting both channels at the same time.

    Work on your EQ a little more, on the incoming song set the low knob to 9 o'clock, mid and high on 10 o'clock. Bring the fader up to 80%, swap the EQ's in rhythm...watch the master levels and see what happens
    Denon X600 - 2x Denon SC-2000 - AKG K181DJ - NI Audio 2

  3. #3
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    Thank you very much for the detailed explanation! Will try it out next time when I'm behind the decks

  4. #4
    Tech Guru Kwal's Avatar
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    Pro tip(from someone who is not a pro):

    When cueing next song, fast forward to drop and set your gain knob. When you are blending into that track lower your gain a bit... EQing is a skill in itself, but so is understanding and learning how to properly mix your gains as well.

  5. #5
    Tech Guru DJAdeSands's Avatar
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    Pro tip(from someone who is not a pro):
    Keep the levels out of the red at all times.

    Slayformoney's tip is spot on, play round with the EQ, use these in conjunction with your faders, you might find that in some cases where you want to mix or blend tunes, the EQ can just be as important as the crossfader/faders.
    See what results you can get, there's no hard and fast rule, how you use it will determine how you sound.

    Knowing what effect EQ has on your sound is super important.

    I remember going to a function with a friend one night, where the 'DJ' had his 'Bass' EQ knob right down, and his 'Mid' EQ knob up full with his 'Treble' up full on his 3 band mixer.. how that guy got gigs is beyond me. Apparently someone told him that was the way to set up a mixer - ear cutting sound. Clueless
    Denon DJ/MC6000KMK2/Launchpad S/LaunchcontrolXL/Traktor Pro 2/Bringin it since 96.

  6. #6
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    You didn't mention anything about the bass/ low EQ, so I'm assuming here that your not really using it.

    It's normally a good thing not too have the bass/low (kick or baseline) of 2 tracks playing over each other. A fair amount of the level will come from the low end so it can easily bump up the levels. Also the low end can get really muddy sounding and loose all clarity.

    A simplified rule would be only have the bass coming through 1 channel at any time (swapping the bass on the drop is a classic transition).
    Xone DB4 | Pioneer DDJ-SP1 | DJ Tech CDJ 101 (x2) | Serato DJ
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  7. #7
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    Thanks for all the support here. Actually I found the problem while watchin Chuckie on the Pioneer DJ Sound Show. When I switched the EQ Curve on my Mixer to Isolater everything got normal again. Now the master is on a constant level when I blend between 2 songs and bringing in the next one slowly. Seems that the EQ setting was not right in anyway. As pointed out from me before the tracks are always sounding good but the master told me that it was a bit too loud...

    @rob2192: I'm always killing the LOW when bringing in the next song. Sorry when my inital post sounded as a total beginner but I'm definitely more advanced Thanks anyway it definitely a good tip for everyone that isn't.

    @DJAdeSands: Oh yes you are so right - I can't understand the DJs that are always pushing it to the dark red...
    Anyway I'm never doing it was one of the first things I learned from Master Laidback Luke

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