Finding out the mix point?
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  1. #1
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    Default Finding out the mix point?

    Hi everyone,

    Happy new year and I hope you are all well?

    Ive got a question regarding mixpoints, Ive been mixing for many years but cant get my mixes to roll like the mixes i listen to on mixcloud or live within a club environment.

    I understand the whole phrase mixing scenario but whenever i use specific points it dosent roll as id like?

    How do you people work out those smooth transitions mixpoints?

    I mix deep/tech house.

    Any tips or advice would be great.

    Thanks

    James

  2. #2
    Moderator keithace's Avatar
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    many years?

    you would understand where and when to start the next record...

    At the very least you should be able to look at a record/wav form and realize when and where the tracks gets louder...
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  3. #3
    Tech Guru SlayForMoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithace View Post
    many years?

    you would understand where and when to start the next record...

    At the very least you should be able to look at a record/wav form and realize when and where the tracks gets louder...
    In his defence, I think he knows when/where part, it's just the finesses that trouble him.
    Some thing I learned long time ago when I started the transition from bedroom into clubs:
    - things are less obvious when you're just the listener (even if you know the tracks that are being mixed)
    - loud volume in clubs also "kills" our ability to recognize what's going on in the sound
    - club DJ's tend to, week after week, use songs that they know will fit together
    - online mixes are more often than not very well reharsed if they are live (very careful track selection that goes well into each other) or are even studio/software produced (like the live mixes only + EQ-ing, compression, phrasing adjusted, some parts perfectly looped, chopped, synced)

    My point - don't worry about it, practice and experiment with tracks.
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    Tech Guru 3heads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlayForMoney View Post
    My point - don't worry about it, practice and experiment with tracks.
    Exactly. To get more of a feel (and a better perspective on how "perfect" a transition has to be), I'd recommend playing back2back with someone else. Always fun (when it works, doesn't work with everyone, but when it does it's ace).
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  5. #5
    Moderator keithace's Avatar
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    I stand by my comment. You can read a wavform and look and see when there are changes/breaks in the track. Use your minute markers and do some simple math to help figure out mix spots.DJ101

  6. #6

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    All the above and then some.. I do know what your talking about. One very important thing is eq it's very critical extremely and this brings into account headroom of the channels. One thing I've done recently it always mix with line faders at most 3/4 and eq at 12'oclock...

    another thing not all dj programs are the same nor is the controller integration. I have learned to despise serato dj what sounds good coming out of the speakers and headphones doesn't always sound good recorded. It is something that I noticed back before they offered their dvs Kit. I have raised the concern many times in forum and opened support tickets all with no good outcome. That's on my ns6
    To be exact the issue comes from the channel gain knob has no control over the actual gain within serato. I have tried with autogain on and off and have kind of figured out ways to correct it slightly. But sometimes tracks still sound as though they are being compressed and really efs up the volume


    I load up traktor with my ns6, typhoon, z1, z2, and problem disappears.

    So keep that all in mind make sure your track isn't coming in hot without you even knowing it also don't use keylock or key correction unless your mixing lossless tracks. It introduces phasing issues on the low end and in general makes mixes sound worse. This is a small annoying thing but it is what it is. To overcome the mixing of broad key ranges I suggest learning how pitching up or down changes keys and go from there. Also it is not just software that keylock does this on.
    On that point a 224/256M4A(iTunes) track will be affected worse the. A 320mp3 however they are both affected by this.

    Another thing if you are mixing some lossless with lossy mind your eq and gain extra carefully because they mix together differently due to the sound spectrum each represents.

    If I think of more things I'll let reply...

    FWIW this same issue has bugged me lots

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithace View Post
    I stand by my comment. You can read a wavform and look and see when there are changes/breaks in the track. Use your minute markers and do some simple math to help figure out mix spots.DJ101
    If that is a "101" skill, I'd love to hear which skills you think represent "201," "301," and "401."
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  8. #8
    Tech Guru the_bastet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithace View Post
    I stand by my comment. You can read a wavform and look and see when there are changes/breaks in the track. Use your minute markers and do some simple math to help figure out mix spots.DJ101
    What if your spinning detroit techno or schranza tunes with no breakdown? Your comment assumes that every single track he plays has the same framework.




    ...

    ..

    TBH burc. It takes practice. Take your 6 favorite tunes. Mix em back to back over and over until you find the perfect mix techniques. There is no one single technique since most songs are different.

    Though, here are a few techniques to keep in mind:
    Window mixing: Mixing during the breakdowns and buildups of tunes.
    EQ Mixing: Slowly kill each eq on the previously playing tune leading up to the point of mixing into the next tune completely
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  9. #9
    Newbie rubidoo's Avatar
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    Default Deep / Tech House Smoothing the Mix

    Quote Originally Posted by james woodall View Post
    Hi everyone,

    Happy new year and I hope you are all well?

    Ive got a question regarding mixpoints, Ive been mixing for many years but cant get my mixes to roll like the mixes i listen to on mixcloud or live within a club environment.

    I understand the whole phrase mixing scenario but whenever i use specific points it dosent roll as id like?

    How do you people work out those smooth transitions mixpoints?

    I mix deep/tech house.

    Any tips or advice would be great.

    Thanks

    James

    Hey James - as a fellow Deep/Tech House guy, I think I know what you may be looking for. Something I recently discovered is the amount of looping that goes on during transitions. A good DJ/friend of mine really opened my eyes to this. He introduced me to 128 and 256 (example) beats vs a typical 16/32 beat mix.

    First - build a playlist - check that keys and BPM are at least close and in the best order
    Then - Start your fist track in your headphones and create a nice loop - 8-16-or 32 - Make sure it sounds nice.

    Now - Take a breath - and take your time - and slowly bring the Loop into the empty space. Make mental note where you first heard the track through your monitors and where your line level was.
    IMPORTANT - Keep track of the count!!!

    An exercise I like to use is - Introduce a track over the course of 60 - 90-seconds!
    Stop worrying about the intro vs. Outro of the track start making your own Super-Intros / Super-Outros with loops - Big - LONG LOOPS.

    OK - NEXT - For your first mix - depending on "where" you are taking your audience, bring up your next track in your headphones - and - again - create a nice clean loop - you might need to scrub through the track to find something nice

    Get your count going and start the next track on-beat with the volume level at ZERO - AND I like to set the BASS at 9 or 10:00 -
    Now - Slowly - Slowly - Slowly, bring up the next track and make note - where - you FIRST hear it.
    Check your Beat-match - and make sure your previous track has Plenty of time left - if NOT - Make a quick loop and let it ride.
    Continue bringing the new track in with minimal BASS - then - when you are ready to mix and your levels are pretty equal

    TRICKY PART - - now take a breath - get your count in your head - Ready to Mix?
    - Turn the BASS of your last BAR (all 4 Beats) Down to 9:00
    THEN - When your New Track starts its 1st Bar - Turn that BASS to 12:00 RIGHT WHEN THE NEXT BAR STARTS!!

    FINAL - Now your new track has taken over and you can release the loop when you like
    Now - Again - Slowly - Remove the 1st Track from the mix and make note where you LAST hear it through your monitors
    NOTE: CONTINUE BEAT-MATCHING ON YOUR WAY OUT

    I like to play with Gates/Delays and such on the OUT-Going track while the volume disappears

    Hope that answered your question - of not - sorry - I'm snowed in and bored and felt like helping out a fellow Deep/Tech House Fan :-)

  10. #10
    Moderator keithace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by soundinmotiondj View Post
    If that is a "101" skill, I'd love to hear which skills you think represent "201," "301," and "401."
    it's one of the first things I learned after beatmatching and EQing...

    It's part of knowing your music. Is it not?

    I have no problem correcting myself. Having a wav form to read is much easier than reading a piece of vinyl.
    100 =signal routing and how to hook your shit up
    101 = beat matching, eqing, knowing your music
    201 = cohesive mixing techniques, record selection
    301 = proper use of effects and loops
    401 = scratching
    Last edited by keithace; 01-07-2016 at 05:04 PM.
    Weapons, not food, not homes, not shoes
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