Shure Stanton Pickering
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  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Default Shure Stanton Pickering

    Hi Folks

    I have a pair of Technics 1200'si use for mobile DJing. They are currently fitted with Shure M44G's which work fine. However when i got them they were fitted with a pair of old Pickering V15s. I have a few records which are in pretty bad shape which the Shures skip on. The V15s play through the scratches fine.

    I balanced the tonearms for each cart properly and tried anti skate at 0 and the same as tracking weight. No difference. So i was thinking they may be a better stylus. However they seem hard to come by these days. It seems the Stanton D71ee will fit the V15 cart so was wondering if they may be a good DJ stylus. Any thoughts?

    thanks ian.

  2. #2
    Tech Guru the_bastet's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    Cincinnati, OH
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    2,707

    Default

    The M44G's and 7's are meant to be all around carts with a focus on scratching. They do not track well and honestly aren't the greatest for just listening or mixing records.

    If you are not doing any turntablism, grab a set of white labels.
    - Equipment - 2X Technics 1200, 2X Audio Technica ATLP1240, 2X XDJ700, 2X XDJ1000 MK2, Denon DNX-1100, Mixars DUO, DJM750 MK2, NI Audio 10, NI Aduio 4, Serato SL3, 4X Shure M44-7, 2X Ortofon Pro S, 2X Numark Groove Tool, Maschine MK3, Samson Carbon 49, Roland SE-02, Novation Launchcontrol, TouchOSC, Nocation Peak, Arturia MiniBrute, Korg Volca Kick, MicroKorg (Classic), NI Komplete Audio 6

  3. #3
    Tech Mentor
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    Nov 2011
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    Dayton, Ohio, USA
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    No. The D71ee is a fragile hifi stylus and with an elliptical diamond. Also not a big fan of Shure. Shure's sort of responsible for the BS trend of low down forces that led a lot of people to rapidly damage their vinyl. Even the Whitelabel suspension isn't designed to support enough VTF to compensate for the high cantilever inertia. It's not the downforce that damages records, but the frequency intermodulation distortion from either poor alignment and/or insufficient VTF to dampen distortion from loud treble transients. Case in point, I was on a hunt for a while for a particular rare Shure test record used. I was only able to find ones that were so worn as to be useless... that's what the Shure calibration methodology produces: record damage. If a company gives you a range of VTF for a tip, say from 2 to 4 grams, use the highest end of that: 4 grams. If the suspension bottoms out on flat, warp-free records, or is very near to doing so at that VTF, get another design. You also need to get your arm & headshell mass just right for a given needle compliance so that the arm moves with warps but doesn't jump or distort on deep recorded bass when it should be easily and subtlety compressing the suspension.
    Last edited by Reticuli; 02-28-2017 at 01:48 AM.

  4. #4
    Newbie
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    Feb 2017
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    Default

    thanks folks. lot s to think about...

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