About the MICROWAVE DJs article
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  1. #1
    Tech Mentor janzak's Avatar
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    Default About the MICROWAVE DJs article

    So I've got some random thoughts... was initially gonna post this as a reply to the blog post but I want to hear what people think.

    "I gotta add something.

    It seems this debate is always about microwave DJs stealing gigs from old skool scratch DJs, but it feels a very important group is being left out.

    What about people who've practically never touched a vinyl record let alone DJed with one, but also don't take microwave DJs seriously and want to make a name for themselves?

    As far as I'm concerned they (we) BOTH lack the many tedious years of vinyl experience AND we compete with a growing group of microwave DJs who love taking shortcuts that actually work. If an experienced DJ can't compete with them, how would we?

    So what's the choice, first buy a couple 1210s, practice for 10 years for that experience and then make the switch to digital? Or jump straight on the digital DJ bandwagon, learn the tools of the future but miss out on all the basics?"

    It's not rhetorical, merely something I've been thinking a bit of... plus I'm at work and tired so I don't feel like leaving just yet
    I used to link music in my signature but nowadays I don't.

  2. #2
    Tech Guru Yul's Avatar
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    The point is (in my own opinion): doesn't matter the gear man. Go digital if that feels right for you or vinyl or cdjs or both/all whatever. The article is about the attitude.

    But
    Learn the basics so when you'll have to beatmatch by ear (it will happen) you won't look like a sucker. Learn music culture, grow taste, develop skills. Raise a universe, a personality. Don't pick up your playlists from the same obvious artists/charts. Be curious.
    etc, etc...


    my two cents

  3. #3
    Tech Mentor Phormula1.8T's Avatar
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    this may sound really stupid but....even if your going digital to start with...just dont look at the screen. beatmatching isnt some sort of archaic method that cannot be practiced on most controllers. or hell just just mix/scratch on a dvs with the computer far away from you.
    Durty Harry
    13" Macbook Pro, Numark TTXUSB, Vestax VMC002XLU (upgraded to cf-pcv crossfader,) Vestax PMC-05 PRO III, Audio 4 DJ, Kontrol X1, Traktor Scratch Duo. -----WWW.LABWERXDJS.NET-----

  4. #4
    Tech Wizard FUFR's Avatar
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    ok, I will just ask.

    what the heck is a microwave dj?
    do I have to bring my microwave to the next gig?
    there is no catering?!?
    Y M C A !

    2x 1200sl, Denon MC-6000, VCI-100 SE Arcade, Midifighter, BCR 2000, Traktor X1, Tracktor Scratch Pro, Pioneer 600 mixer, a mother in law (for sale!) and loads of coffee!

  5. #5
    Tech Guru charo's Avatar
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    its someone that, using all the modern technology, fast cooks his or her dj experience, skipping the flavoring that slow roasting brings out....

    it's not really a cut against anyone using digital equipment or controllerists, cause even some serato djs are considered microwave djs

  6. #6
    Tech Mentor fusion's Avatar
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    How does one start on digital, but avoid becoming a 'fast cooked' dj?

    I want to start on digital, and don't have the money to buy an old setup for the point of learning to beatmatch...

    My uncle has an old denon system which he still uses, which I am going to use to learn to beatmatch on, yet there is more to people becoming 'microwave dj's' than just not knowing how to beatmatch yes?

  7. #7
    Tech Wizard pushplay's Avatar
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    What about the guys like me who hail from the music production side of things and picks up on what you "digital DJ's" do with ease cause that's what he has been doing with producing his own tracks anyways?
    Using software like Traktor to bring a new dyanamic to production skills and live manipulation.

    Are we microwavable?

  8. #8
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    i agree with janzak point on this. Do you have to wait ten years? The issue here is not so much about beatmatching or set planning or creative set feel or whatever you want to express through as a performer.

    the thing now is that the audience has changed a lot from lets say 1990s or even before that when people went to a CERTAIN kind of clubs and were interested into listening a certain performance and not radio stuff that they could normally hear.

    Now you have the two sides of the spectrum one u still have that kind of party goers that want to listen something different and a big majority of club goers that just want to listen to commercial top 40 stuff.

    At this point if you have to dj in front of a crowd of top 40 club goers anyone can do it in a small matter of time.

    Now if you take the same dj and put it in a crowd of i dont know for exemple some venue such as DC 10 there is no way in hell one he s gonna get booked and two if he is booked the crowd is expecting something special that they ll probably leave the place.

    i think there is room for everyone Veteran dj yes have to re invent themselves and new upcoming dj has to catch up and learn from those djs cause even though the technologically can beatmatch for you without any problem,
    if you dont understand sound, phrase and beat, and building set structure there is no way in hell you ll be able to catch up to those veteran djs.

    i am sorry its all mixed in this statement but i am sure people will understand the point i am making here

  9. #9
    Tech Guru charo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fusion View Post
    How does one start on digital, but avoid becoming a 'fast cooked' dj?

    I want to start on digital, and don't have the money to buy an old setup for the point of learning to beatmatch...

    My uncle has an old denon system which he still uses, which I am going to use to learn to beatmatch on, yet there is more to people becoming 'microwave dj's' than just not knowing how to beatmatch yes?
    IMO you avoid the fastcook instadj route by training your ears and learning your music, literally removing any visual aid beyond tracks/playlist and time position of song. just like the days of records, when most people only had a limited number of records, you keep a small playlist and practice practice practice. I think it's easy to throw a 1000 songs in a folder and just start mixing...you never get the intimate feel of only having those few choice records and the depth you will learn these tracks, and really the structure of most dance tracks.

    you start off without using every FX chain in the world, and really trying not to hogwild on the EQ...much was learned in the days when mixers didn't have individual eq, and this carries over to production; when mixing and things aren't jiving, try messing with the relation of the vol faders of the tracks first.

    those are just some thoughts off the top of my head, to me its about what's its always been about, the music, the audio experience

    if its the denon dual deck cd players with no touch or even jog beyond scroll, then i recommend you practice and get good on them. if you can rock out on those, everything else will seem easy... burning cds will be a pain but you'll then have those as a quick backup for when you're using the digital setup out.

  10. #10
    Tech Mentor janzak's Avatar
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    charo, not using any visual aid at all is actually a GREAT tip. Thataway you can both use your digital gear AND practice your "core skills" at the same time. Great stuff

    Edit: also I think my main point was that us "middlegrounders" seem overlooked in the entire old vs new school debate.
    I used to link music in my signature but nowadays I don't.

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