Mixing Between Slower/Faster Songs
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  1. #1
    Tech Wizard
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    Default Mixing Between Slower/Faster Songs

    How would you go about mixing a 128 bpm song into a slower 100 bpm song and vice versa. I know there's no set way, but this is a question that's been bugging me.
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  2. #2
    Tech Wizard quuz's Avatar
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    Traktor Kontrol X1 FX Tutorials Part 2/4: Freeze Effect
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skSWu...layer_embedded

    In part 2 of 4 in this series, Ean uses the Delay effect and its freeze function to transition between 2 different tempos - a simple trick to ensure smooth transitions with minimal effort.


  3. #3
    DJTT Moderator bloke Karlos Santos's Avatar
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    Or you just drop the next track on the downbeat of the first track.
    If the second track drops on the downbeat (as well) straight in, the difference is only slight despite the drop in bmp.
    You dont have to do long transitions. It all depends on the genre as to how effective it is.

    This is real DJ skill that is learnt with practice.

    I actually think that too many DJs use the freeze or echo and mask what is a fundamental skill in djing. It can sound bloody awful if its not done well as in Eans video. Just a delay mess.

    Jus my 2p.

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    Retired DJTT Moderator DvlsAdvct's Avatar
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    Yeah, I've played around with the freeze effect and have found some very specific uses for it, but all in all a good mix is a LOT more satisfying and useful.

    There are a bunch of techniques for mixing slower to faster. You can go with a hard cut like Karlos said, just drop the first beat of the new track on the last downbeat (usually after the last beat) of the old track

    If you have complimentary endings you can mix on those. So if the rhythm and melody of the outgoing track goes away and it's just one long guitar chord or vocal line you can either hard drop the next track, and maybe some creative looping to the re-sync'd beat could keep the energy going, or if the incoming track has a fade as well you can have these layer to create an interesting texture to lead into the next track.

    Also, you can turn your keylock off and just gradually, or suddenly, slow down the main track until it is matched with the new one while bringing in the new one. Instead of the doing the echo out this is a lot less smooth, but it can be a lot more powerful of a transition. If it goes poorly, though, it can go VERY poorly.

    The main issue you have is the beat. You don't want the rhythm to get skewed. So just stay in a safe zone of sounds and let the energy build on its own. I spent a LOT of time learning to do this before I ever learned to really blend on long transitions, and I have to say it is really fulfilling because you actually have to control the floor beyond moving from one song to the other. You have to make them want to slow down and speed up rather drastically.
    It's the FAQ. Read it.

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  5. #5
    DJTT Moderator bloke Karlos Santos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DvlsAdvct View Post

    Also, you can turn your keylock off and just gradually, or suddenly, slow down the main track until it is matched with the new one while bringing in the new one. Instead of the doing the echo out this is a lot less smooth, but it can be a lot more powerful of a transition. If it goes poorly, though, it can go VERY poorly.

    .
    Yeah, this is a trick i urge everyone to learn. It can get you out of tricky spots and can sound awesome and very impressive. Loop a few bars and slow it down on the beat each beat getting slower in equal measure so it smooth, continue the loop and bring the next track in. Very effective.

    Also very shitty if it goes wrong...hahaha


    Also re: my first post. You dont need to slam the next track in. It can be done so that the last beat of the first track is still resonating . This makes smoother transition before the next beat comes in but isnt so harsh.
    I do it with the up-faders, not always with the x-fader.

    Its just like a golf shot. Hit the sweet spot and the mix sounds great quick and smooth..

  6. #6
    Tech Wizard
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    Thanks for the tips. Appreciate it.
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  7. #7
    Tech Convert
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    I would simply do a power down or drag the platter to a stop while bringing the next record in... (I use Serato though, might not be possible with Traktor or whatever)

    DJing, especially live, is not always about being perfect. it's about setting a vibe, and sometimes you stop everything you're doing and start again.

    then again I'm used to playing sets of different styles to rotate a dancefloor at a club so maybe it's just me

  8. #8
    Retired DJTT Moderator DvlsAdvct's Avatar
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    Definitely something you can do in Traktor. Just make sure you don't have the keylock on
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  9. #9
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    Have fun, and do what sounds right at the time. Although, I use the delay freeze effect quite often. I use it as a back up sometimes when the transition may sound like it could take a wrong turn, just freeze the track your trying to fade on an interesting sound and bring the filter up gradually so it sounds like the track just dissapears.

    But like they said I also use it to jump drastically from BPM's but I usually just wait a track and bring the BPM up or down a bit instead of making a big jump in BPM, Thats just me maybe..
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  10. #10
    Tech Guru belchman's Avatar
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    it's all about the scrub-backs I got into mixing through the UK garage scene (Karlos, help me out here buddy..?!)

    "Can I get a reeeewind??"

    The old promo CDs just used to be a load of intros, designed to be scrubbed about! Was great! it's an old trick, and seriously dated now - and even the punters think it's the mark of a shite DJ - but back in the day, it was epic!

    I tend to use breakdowns to change tempos. I play electro/crack house into dubstep and visa versa and often just use breakdowns to build up to the drop. Makes the naughty 1-40 hit alot harder, and makes people think "shit! he's just slammed in some dub!".

    It's hard though, takes a whole lot of practice!

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