Acceptable KBPS
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Acceptable KBPS

  1. #1
    Tech Guru tyfurious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    798

    Default Acceptable KBPS

    Let me and everyone know what you deem as an "acceptable" KBPS for you audio files (essentially how good the music sounds). 128? 192? 320? Or even lossless (FLAC etc.)?

    I'll personally accept 128 on my Pop music and on any samples/accapellas I use, but I have to have my beats at least at 192 although preferably at 320.

    My standard would be 320, but I do a lot of non-club parties that want to hear pop songs... Because of this I have to have wider variety of music and I tend to get a fair amount of music from friends that normally have it at 192. Most all of my House/Trance/Etc. music is 320.

  2. #2
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    924

    Default

    I buy wav off Beatport, if its mp3 - 320kbs, with not much exception unless its some crazy rare track which is impossible to find, then I'll work with whatever bit rate its got (if it's 128 kbs, I junk it).

    CBR only, VBR is questionable in quality and makes certain mp3 capable CD decks go ape shit.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    1,794

    Default

    Nothing wrong with using VBRs, they still sound just as good as CBRs as long as the max bit rate is 320

  4. #4
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    924

    Default

    My bad, I meant to write compatibility but was still thinking about mp3 quality in my head lol.

    Anyhow, that last part of the post was focused entirely on actual playback on certain CD decks, Denon decks are notorious for not playing nice with VBR format, and from time to time, even my CDJ-1000mk3 would get somewhat pissy. They may have corrected this with a firmware update, who knows.

  5. #5
    Tech Mentor ANok?'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    167

    Default

    i usually stick to 320 unless it's some kind of remix or something where you can only get a lesser quality file. I've been getting more strict about my files lately and trashing a lot of old stuff and re-importing CDs and whatnot. When you plan on a nice loud system you really start to notice when a track is bad quality.
    2 x Technics 1200 mk5
    Behringer DJX 700
    Traktor Scratch Pro and Audio 8 DJ
    Novation Dicers
    http://soundcloud.com/anok-1

  6. #6
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,019

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ANok? View Post
    i usually stick to 320 unless it's some kind of remix or something where you can only get a lesser quality file. I've been getting more strict about my files lately and trashing a lot of old stuff and re-importing CDs and whatnot. When you plan on a nice loud system you really start to notice when a track is bad quality.
    same here. im down to very few 192's. When I play 320 all nite as soon as 192 comes into the rotation, I can tell right away.

  7. #7
    Tech Student Cribstopper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Midwest America
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I stick with lossless whenever possible!! Most lossy encoders, for example those used to create MP3, OGG, etc use a low pass filter in the encoding process. This cuts out frequencies in the upper part of the audible spectrum (about 16kHz-20kHz), leaving a lot of detail out. While humans can really hear between only 20Hz and 20kHz, a lot of the frequencies in this range are composed of higher frequency harmonics that are well above the threshold of the human ear. Using a low pass filter in the encoding process cuts off these higher frequencies (which is done because they're harder to encode, and saves space!). This cuts out a lot of detail, especially if you're listening to the music on a great system.

    Here's a visible example of what the upper end of the spectrum looks like with different types of compression:


    In a club environment, it might not matter as much because the system is super loud and typically has a fair amount of harmonic distortion. I must say however, that most of the time I can pick out the lossy from the lossless, even in a club environment from listening to things like the cymbols in a song. Almost all of the time they sound super distorted when lossy.

    Just my two cents, but then again I'm a bit of an elitest when it comes to my audio. :P
    Last edited by Cribstopper; 05-16-2010 at 12:30 PM.
    "You try and hurt Mozart, you're gonna get a bullet in your head courtesy of Butch Cassidy."

  8. #8
    Tech Guru Bassline Brine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,818

    Default

    320 or bust. .WAV's if you have the space I suppose.
    BREAKBEATS AND OTHER MUSICAL ADVENTURES
    Facebook - Soundcloud - Mixcloud - Mixlr - Twitter

  9. #9
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    79

    Default

    I find that if there are very complex parts in a song it will use a quite high bit rate and a lower bitrate for something such as silence. The average bit rate may not be as high as the bitrate of an MP3 of the same quality with constant bitrate.

    You should use VBR encoding when consistent audio quality is the top priority

    I also find that using CBR makes my tracks sound flat, vice VBR where there are more richer.

    But that's my opinion, it's basically what you prefer to to rip at.
    MacBook 13.3/Behringer VMX-200/NI Audio 2 DJ
    NI Kontrol X1/Traktor1.2.4

  10. #10

    Default

    I had three copies of Michael Jackson - Billie Jean and somehow the 128Kbps sounded the best. I know if I had the same original WAV I could get a 256Kbps copy and it would probably sound best, but I just kept playing the 128Kbps version and it was solid. You guys are nuts. There is no way that you can tell between 256Kbps and 320Kbps or WAV with your ears. Stop dreaming that you are a robot. Not even Daft Punk !

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •