Beginner mixing techniques
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Default Beginner mixing techniques

    Alright, basically I'm really in to mixing and I use Virtual DJ. I don't have a controller yet but I have some effects mapped out on my keyboard.

    So far, the only mixing technique I've really been able to do is mix in the breakdown of the track... I'm sure it's the simplest and most overused technique out there. Sometimes I beatmatch and then play with the EQs as I cross over to the next track.

    This really impresses my friends cause they have no idea how simple it is, so... How can I advance these techniques? I mix mainly electro house, prog house, etc etc?

  2. #2

  3. #3
    DJTT Tankard fullenglishpint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    St Albans, UK
    Posts
    7,101

    Default

    Experiment!

    For one thing read up on harmonic mixing as this makes your job as a DJ much easier, but I'd say the main thing to get the hang of at the beginning is working out where the sections are in the music. You'll notice that most electronic music has a 4/4 time signature and different parts of the track tend to change at multiples of 4 or 8 bars (a bar is 4 beats).

    For example, you might have a track with 8 bars of intro at the beginning before it drops, so if you can time this to coincide with a drop in the previous song and transition between the 2 using EQs in the intervening 8 bars it sounds like it was always meant to be that way.
    TSP 2 | Serato DJ | Live 8 | MBP (SSD + HDD) | AIAIA TMA-1 Fool's Gold Edition | 1200 Mk2s | MidiFighter | KRK RP5
    Xone: DB4 | Pioneer CDJ-2000 Nexus
    DJTT FAQ | Read my guide to AUDIO CABLES

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fullenglishpint View Post
    Experiment!

    For one thing read up on harmonic mixing as this makes your job as a DJ much easier, but I'd say the main thing to get the hang of at the beginning is working out where the sections are in the music. You'll notice that most electronic music has a 4/4 time signature and different parts of the track tend to change at multiples of 4 or 8 bars (a bar is 4 beats).

    For example, you might have a track with 8 bars of intro at the beginning before it drops, so if you can time this to coincide with a drop in the previous song and transition between the 2 using EQs in the intervening 8 bars it sounds like it was always meant to be that way.
    Yeah that's been my #1 transition so far, just using the 'drop' from Track B in the breakdown of Track A... With the right tracks you can really fool some ears haha...

  5. #5
    DJTT Infectious Moderator photojojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    13,939

    Default

    And record yourself a bunch. Then listen to the whole thing to see what it sounds like. If you don't like something figure out how to change it. Another thing I think is important when practicing is not to automatically start over if you mess up. Practice getting out of screw ups so if you make a mistake live you'll be better prepared to cope with it.
    Chris Jennings FHP

    Podcast - Soundcloud - Mixcloud - Beatport Charts - x

  6. #6
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    588

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by photojojo View Post
    Practice getting out of screw ups so when you make a mistake live you'll be better prepared to cope with it.


    Learned the hard way myself, no matter how well prepared and rehearsed you are, it will happen lol.

  7. #7
    Tech Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,597

    Default

    yeah i agree with fullenglishpint and photojojo. best way to learn is by experimenting and analyzing the shit out of your own work.

    also, listen to tons of dj mixes, go to events where the djs are known for their djing work - really pay attention and study what these guys are doing and apply it to your own sessions.

    tutorials and sharing tips and tricks with friends or on forums is cool for beginners, but if you really want to develop your own style the best way is to just practice lots, study lots and don't be afraid to experiment with new ideas.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •