Harmonic mixing
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Thread: Harmonic mixing

  1. #1

    Default Harmonic mixing

    I've been studying harmonic mixing and practicing and songs blend really nice with each other when you follow the Camelot wheel.

    One thing i noticed, while using VDJ is that some songs are on the C#m key, which this is not in the camelot wheel, what should i do to blend this key into another one?

  2. #2

    Default

    Hi,

    C#m is actually the same key as Dbm. When you see the "#" sign, that's called a Sharp notation, and when you see a "B", that's called Flat. Just different ways of writing the same thing.

    To avoid confusion, it's easier to use the Camelot notation. It saves a lot of time, and you don't have to memorize that C#m is compatible with C#m, Dbm, E, F#m, Abm, G#m, and can modulate into Ebm / D#m.

    Whew.

    12A goes with 11A, 12A, 1A, 12B or modulates into 2A. Much easier if you read http://harmonic-mixing.com/HowTo.aspx


    Good luck!
    Yakov

  3. #3
    Tech Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mixed In Key View Post
    Hi,

    C#m is actually the same key as Dbm. When you see the "#" sign, that's called a Sharp notation, and when you see a "B", that's called Flat. Just different ways of writing the same thing.

    To avoid confusion, it's easier to use the Camelot notation. It saves a lot of time, and you don't have to memorize that C#m is compatible with C#m, Dbm, E, F#m, Abm, G#m, and can modulate into Ebm / D#m.

    Whew.

    12A goes with 11A, 12A, 1A, 12B or modulates into 2A. Much easier if you read http://harmonic-mixing.com/HowTo.aspx


    Good luck!
    Yakov
    I second the motion. Mixed In Key leads the harmonic mixing market.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mixed In Key View Post
    Hi,

    C#m is actually the same key as Dbm. When you see the "#" sign, that's called a Sharp notation, and when you see a "B", that's called Flat. Just different ways of writing the same thing.

    To avoid confusion, it's easier to use the Camelot notation. It saves a lot of time, and you don't have to memorize that C#m is compatible with C#m, Dbm, E, F#m, Abm, G#m, and can modulate into Ebm / D#m.

    Whew.

    12A goes with 11A, 12A, 1A, 12B or modulates into 2A. Much easier if you read http://harmonic-mixing.com/HowTo.aspx


    Good luck!
    Yakov
    thanks alot, i didn't know VDJ was actually capable of showing me the keys in key codes (12A) etc. thanks alot for the quick reposnse.

  5. #5
    Tech Guru dope's Avatar
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    Default

    I've been wondering, is mixing in key really noticeable ?

  6. #6

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    Its really good, you really see difference playing the songs together...i felt in love with it.

  7. #7
    Tech Wizard
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    Default

    sounds a bit cleaner. I use it when I can, but matching the beat and key narrows the selection of the next track.
    Traktor Z2, Denon SC3900(2), Kontrol F1, MidiFighter3D, HDJ-2000, Mixed in Key, Platinum Notes, Jack and Coke. (Previously- Rane 68, Traktor DJM-t1, Pioneer DJM-800, CDJ-2000s (2), Traktor S4, Stanton 150s)

  8. #8
    RGAS Guru Xonetacular's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dope View Post
    I've been wondering, is mixing in key really noticeable ?
    Harmonic mixing software and following the camelot wheel is mostly marketing hype (see the first two posts here...) or just general internet hype and in practice is incredibly overrated and when used how most people who pick it up by following the wheel religiously is pretty limiting.

    Not to mention a lot of the time with song structure or mixing style key is completely irrelevant, and there is more to mixing in key than going around one direction in a circle.


  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xonetacular View Post
    Harmonic mixing software and following the camelot wheel is mostly marketing hype (see the first two posts here...) or just general internet hype and in practice is incredibly overrated and when used how most people who pick it up by following the wheel religiously is pretty limiting.

    Not to mention a lot of the time with song structure or mixing style key is completely irrelevant, and there is more to mixing in key than going around one direction in a circle.
    There is mixing by a semitone which is going from 2A to 9A (adding +7) and 2 semitones which is 2A to 4A (adding +2). That's the only 2 methods i know of.

  10. #10
    Tech Mentor SpeshulEd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dope View Post
    I've been wondering, is mixing in key really noticeable ?

    Ya know, I'm starting to wonder the same thing.

    I mixed harmonically for a couple of months, but don't do it so much anymore. I think it was helpful in guiding me to make better song choices when I was starting out as well as help limit my selection a bit, but there were always those occasions when songs still didn't work and you could tell this by ear.

    I think the more important steps are knowing your collection and thinning out the crap. that helped me a lot
    nope.

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