mpc renaissance vs maschine - Page 2
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  1. #11

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    true, i understand! just a little quick question, what willl i need for producing then?

  2. #12
    Tech Guru lethal_pizzle's Avatar
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    The answer is of course; it doesn't matter. You'll be able to make sweet music with both. You won't know which one is right for you until you know a bit more about music production. So start off with something cheap (FL maybe), start making mistakes, start learning.
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  3. #13

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    ok, so were shall i start then?

  4. #14
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    Try the demos first. If you use a PC you can check Ableton Live and/or Fruity Loops if you have a Mac you can add Logic to the list. Just download the demo check youtube for tuorials and dedicate lots of time

  5. #15

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    ok, thanks allott guys, i will just download some demos and see what works for me!

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  7. #17

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    hmmm, i litterly dont have one freind who produces or djs :/ had to learn to dj from scratch by myself, say that i bet producing much much harder!

  8. #18
    Tech Guru mostapha's Avatar
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    K, so…uhh…

    Maschine is fine for making a full track, start to finish, including everything. Just about the only things it can't do–conclusively–are time-stretching and song-level automation.

    Mixing on it is weird because NI hates level meters and makes it hard to get gain staging right. It's doable, but it's a huge PITA, since proper gain staging and metering each take up an effect slot on every sound…plus the thing you're using to make the sound leaves you with 1 effect per sound. Or you can overdrive the hell out of its effects and sound like crap. And some of its effects really suck. There's no metering on anything, so the compressor is weird to use. NI can't make a decent reverb to save their company. And a lot of the other stuff is useless or worse than you can get from free or cheap plugins.

    6 months ago, it was awesome because it was the only thing that did exactly what it did, and it was marginally more convenient than an actual groove box (MPC pre-renaissance; Octatrack; etc…there are a lot of them) because it could host plugins and send 16 stereo channels to a DAW.

    Now………As for MPC R vs. Maschine…I own and use a Maschine, and I'm considering switching. But the MPC Renaissance costs twice as much. MPC Studio vs. Maschine is a more legit comparison…and I'm not sure which one wins. Depends on the software.

    The MPC software has level meters…so that's a big plus. If it also supports ReWire (as a slave…there are hacks to make it work as a master), that'd be a huge bonus…basically just saving a step from how I've been using it for the last few days. But it's not that necessary. Legitimate gain staging would be awesome.

    I think the limitations in Maschine are all software related. If NI cares, they'll update the software to compete with the new MPCs. I wouldn't be surprised if there's a paid "Maschine Pro" software upgrade, but it might piss me off.

    As an avid Maschine user who kind of blanketly dislikes NI at this point…it's got a lot of pluses and not really insurmountable downsides…but the ways I get around its downsides involve things that would take a while to learn. For that reason, I'm looking forward to trying out the new MPCs when they hit stores…but unless it's a big upgrade, I'll continue to use Maschine + Logic until I can justify the expense of upgrading to Pro Tools 10.

    So…my standing advice to new producers:

    If you're on a Mac, Logic Pro is insanely cheap for what you get. $200 gets you everything you need to win a grammy (plus recording gear if you want to use voice or real instruments…monitors and headphones and stuff help, etc.…but it's an awesome start). But it's got some quirks. It doesn't really like mono sounds…it makes a lot of assumptions about workflow that kind of fit the way I work but isn't 100%. It's Environment is about the most confusing way to do basic things that I can even begin to imagine. And, it's synths look like Cylon control panels…which makes them hard to learn. If you can get around those shortcomings, it's awesome. I own it, but I'll be upgrading to Pro Tools 10 at some point.

    Ableton is insanely popular for a reason. I hate its workflow, but that's a personal thing. It's also kind of expensive for what you get. I own it, but I'd only use it for computer-based Live shows at this point, and I'm nowhere near good enough to actually do that.

    Cubase is awesome, but it looks like a Cylon control panel…so it's hard to learn. People who use it love it. I'd consider giving it a shot if you didn't have to buy an eLicenser USB dongle for the demo. I already did that for Pro Tools, and I don't need another piece of crap dongle, especially when Steinberg's dongle stuff also has software emulation of their dongles for other software packages.

    Pro Tools is my hands-down favorite for a lot of reasons, mostly relating to workflow and the fact that it imposes very few restrictions on how you work. But it also only uses RTAS, AAX, and TDM plugins……and there aren't many free ones…so you have to pay for things. And it might hold your hand the least while you're learning.

    Reason is a very closed system and a little weird. But it's really powerful. Again…it has everything you need. It's more expensive than Logic but less than just about everything else, especially considering what comes with it. I really do like it…I just feel like I'd get pissed off at not being able to buy plugins for it.

    Apart from that…youtube videos and screen shots are your friends. And stay away from "Lite", "LE", "Elements", or "Essentials" versions of DAWs…they're a lot cheaper and give you an idea of the workflow, but I've found that they're missing such fundamental features that they're basically not useable.

  9. #19

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    thanks for that really aprecated, at this moment in time now, i am thinking that i will stick with djing for abit, and then see what the mpc R is like, but then i face the fact that if the mpc R isnt any good then i will probally just want to purchase an kontrol s2 and that will be of the sale by then so i am in a piccle wether to go too producing or stick with djing!

  10. #20
    Tech Guru mostapha's Avatar
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    Producing is fun. And you can get into it for pretty cheap compared to what it cost even 15 years ago…especially if you don't have any preconceived/developed ideas about how you want to work and just pick a DAW and learn it.

    If I knew nothing, I'd probably just buy Reason and a keyboard with some pads and never worry about what I now consider limitations. Learn gain staging and it sounds as good as anything else. You could do the same with just about any of them. Every single DAW is more powerful than the 2-track DAT machines, hardware sequencers, drum machines, and synths that created EDM.

    It's really sad, but everything is good enough that the little picky details seem so much more important now.

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