Styles of music encouraging certain mixing styles?
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1

    Default Styles of music encouraging certain mixing styles?

    A concept I've been noticing lately is the EXTENT to which different styles of music lend themselves to different styles of mixing, and even to different hardware set ups. I've always spun freeform between 6-7 different EDM genres and because of this, I guess I've previously just ignorantly thought that 4-deck live-remixing with a controller was the ultimate set up for everyone. Over the last couple of years, the one-genre DJs I play with (which is most of them) have shown me that each genre sort of has a mixing style it points you in.

    Techno (tech house, tribal, minimalist etc. etc.) DJs seem to be all about long mixes on two turntables, because there's rarely a key to worry about matching, and it's a very straightforward style that doesn't involve much interaction with the music... I dunno what you'd do if you weren't beatmatching and EQing.

    Trance DJs seem to prefer very simple transition-DJing on CDJs, because, as it's been explained to me, the trance scene is more about track selection and whats in your collection than your mixing. They apparently do this because of the long context of the music, and because of their roots in radio show DJing. So trance DJs seem to make transitions at key moments of the tracks, and not need any more than 4 decks, or any effects.

    Straight Drum n Bass DJs seem to be into a two turntable set up for some of the same reasons Techno DJs are into it.... Long mix, load next track, beatmatch, long mix etc. etc.

    Hardstyle/Hardcore/Gabber DJs are all about crossfade bouncing and filter knobs, and never more than 2 decks.

    Dubstep and Electro DJs are almost always on a mixtrack or some other cheap controller that they usually keep permanently synced and don't do much of anything with between transitions. I think this is more because of the age/experience of DJs who spin these genres predominantly.... Dubstep and Electro don't seem to have found their place yet.

    What do you guys think, are these localized, or have you noticed similar trends in music genres? I've almost never seen anyone mix more than two decks... And I really don't know why that is... Is that a thing that's only useful if you're going through a lot of genres quickly?

  2. #2
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    202

    Default

    Techno and tech-house certainly has keys, ALOT of them actually hehe. to give an example. More often then not the bass gotta match aswell, and the hihats need to communicate for it to sound good.

    I always mix techno, minimal, deephouse and tech-house, and with the right phrasing you can do VERY cool stuff, with melody's, vocals and drops. I'm sure different genre's require different mixing, but the more you get into one, you'll notice there's alot more to it then you once thought.

    For me the key in making a solid techno mix is creating a solid, smooth 2 hour song in which you wouldn't notice a new song coming in at all, and there are million ways of doing that, each one sounding different then one another. Just look at Carl Cox, would you call that straight forward and just mixing a new song in and EQing?

  3. #3
    Tech Guru synthet1c's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,597

    Default

    You and the crew you play with clearly have no immagination when it comes to mixing...

    italian/shranze techno is absolutley the most involved style of mixing, when you do it right if you are beatmatching you should really only play 2 tracks at a time and you will never stop tweaking the mixer because it all sounds good cutting from one track to the next and make sure you drop the bass to increase energy... This type of techno lends itself really well to 3 decks always having 2 tracks running with sync and too many effects is never enough when you create your own edits. The best thing to do is effect bars 12 - 16 occasionally. Effects that suit this style are filters, crushers & flanger, phazer, roll, delay, ring mod... pretty much everything

    Minimal techno and MNiML is not as busy as techno but the same principals apply you should have an ever evolving sound, but you have to respect the groove and just let tracks play... effects are the same as above, use them to create your own edits to close a phrase, and this style of music also lends well to reverb, delay, echo, & white noise generators to fill in the space in the tracks when you want to create some tension.

    Drum n Bass cover a lot of sub genres if you are playing repetitive neuro type stuff then long mixes are usually best. liquid is about being smooth and respecting the music and lyrics, so its all about key and flowing in and out of tracks. Anything more energetic like jump is all about speed and dropping the bass of the new track at the end of a build up to send the crowd wild. Harder stuff depends on the track... In all cases of drum and bass effects should be avioded as they just don't add anything to the music.

    mixing dubstep for me is finding basslines that work together and letting the subs shake shit up, slow mixes are best and no effects should be used. Brostep & electro is pretty much all noobs so yeah they play on mixtracks, but when done right you should be mixing quick and smashing in new tracks at the end of buildups. But you can smash in a track anywhere with brostep though. The mixer doesn't really get used accept for changeovers & I would avoid effects although noise generators can do wonders and the occasional filter is forgivable.

    The key to mixing well though in all cases is to know and love what you are playing, always play the song you can hear in your head next over keymatching and don't try to outshine the music with how awesome you think you are using effect combinations you got of djtt, cause in pretty much all cases it sounds shit when you have a gate, roll and crusher, flanger running all the time over tracks, although those effects do sound great over acapellas so only use them on that.
    Why did the elephant get lost... Cause the Jungle is MASSIVE!

  4. #4
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    324

    Default

    I hope I won't get crucified for this, but I am going to attempt to defend the mixing style of electro. I will agree with your point that at the moment it is plagued by kiddies with mixtracks hitting sync and then crossfading. However, I've also seen some electro DJs just wreck the bejesus out of a set in a very tasteful manner. A few things I've found while mixing electro (my primary genre):

    It's a very "up and down" genre. The main selling point for me on tracks is the drop. You build the track, then drop it. After it drops, you should already be on the way into the next buildup. It works sort of like a wave, if you will. Personally, I like to throw in a few drop swaps in, LP filter right before drops, but also occasionally let the ambient breakdown play through, as people need a break from going balls to the wall all night. This up and down energy allows for a.) an indication for people to go and get a drink/smoke/breather and b.) provides an overall energy level that stays more or less consistent throughout the night, even though you may be banging the bejesus out of it. I like to bang it out hard for awhile, then drop into something with a little less energy to let people recover.

    It does suck though, because you gotta sort through a lot of crap mixes to find some good mixes

    Idk, my $0.02; do with it what you will.
    Traktor Kontrol Z2 | 2x Stanton ST-150 Turntables | Traktor Kontrol F1 | MacBook

    www.mixcloud.com/sunshineraleigh

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by synthet1c View Post
    You and the crew you play with clearly have no immagination when it comes to mixing...
    Yes, Clearly the correct conclusion to come to when i ask if other people play the same way in other places, is that I'm mixing unimaginatively.


    Quote Originally Posted by synthet1c View Post
    The following five paragraphs of self-serving masturbation.
    Not on my face please.

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Sunshine
    hope I won't get crucified for this, but I am going to attempt to defend the mixing style of electro. I will agree with your point that at the moment it is plagued by kiddies with mixtracks hitting sync and then crossfading. However, I've also seen some electro DJs just wreck the bejesus out of a set in a very tasteful manner. A few things I've found while mixing electro (my primary genre):
    Fair enough. I've just really never seen such a thing, even going to see some of my heroes. (for Designer Drugs, one of them showed up, and transitioned at the end of tracks in ableton.) I mix electrohouse too, and I'm hoping some creative stuff happens with mixing in this genre. Currently I'm thinking the best direction to take it is utilizing the new remix decks in traktor to chop songs up on the fly and make a sound like what people are calling "complextro". I think it'd end up sounding SUPER expressive
    Last edited by faderswagger; 04-03-2012 at 05:32 PM.

  6. #6
    Tech Guru synthet1c's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,597

    Default

    Now swallow it bitch... If you don't want an answer don't ask a question, After first line it's actually to help you as I dissagree with your conclusions of how music is mixed, but you can continue being a shit current it's no skin off my teeth champ.
    Why did the elephant get lost... Cause the Jungle is MASSIVE!

  7. #7
    RGAS Guru Xonetacular's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    4,091

    Default

    at this thread
    Last edited by Xonetacular; 04-03-2012 at 05:42 PM.


  8. #8
    Tech Mentor
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Faderswagger... your a punk, why'd you ignore what synthet1c wrote? I read his paragraphs and they are valid points. You simplified the genres way too much...

  9. #9
    Tech Guru Zaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    860

    Default

    This thread is going to be full of win

    @ woah, sick track mate. love it.
    Last edited by Zaniac; 04-03-2012 at 05:51 PM.
    "Wow! I wanna be just like your friend! Thats honestly what i told my mom and dad when i was about 11 years old...i said when i grow up i wanna dj for rich people"

  10. #10
    Tech Guru dope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    571

    Default

    Too lazy to write a novel about but :

    I love how you spit on electro/brostep.
    Ok these genres are mainly played by teenagers, ok. (i won't even try to argue about the gear stuff, especially on DJTT. Loads of guys here playing genres that are not brostep or electro and doing the job well on cheap controllers)
    Still, admit that it requires skills to mix. It's not like techno/house or any genre that is based on subtle variations.
    Brostep/moombahcore/electro are what I would call "maximal", in opposition with minimal and more "chilled" stuff. There is so much going on that you have to make sure the various instruments of the 2(3) tracks you mix together don't clash and walk on eachother, resulting in a crap sounding output.

    I would say brostep/electro and stuff require maybe a bit more prep work, so that a quick mixing style still doesn't sound odd.

    Last point, about the "noobie crossfade". The amount of energy and rage some tracks have require that kind of mixing, and you just can't let 2 tracks playing together for a long time.

    I'll sum my post with an example that I mixed at a gig :

    A track was :



    During the 2nd build up, i mixed it with the beginning acapella/build up of track B :



    If i remember well, when the first track dropped i crossfaded the acapella, brutal cut to let the A track express itself.
    Then for 32 bars i brought the acapella/build up of promises again to finally cut brutally to track B with a bass switch.

    Yeah, it was dubstep/brostep, yeah I used brutal crossfading, that thing you seem to classify as a "noobie kind of mixing". Still, it sounded supergood, I surprised the whole crowd, and as quick and brutal it was, it remained smooth and natural.

    So please stop hating on genres because they are not of your taste. Every creative and insipered mixing requires skills.
    Last edited by dope; 04-03-2012 at 06:03 PM.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •