The most essential part of Dj'ing? - Page 4
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  1. #31
    Tech Guru SirReal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pearce161 View Post
    by practicing on ya set-up (a lot) and listening to ya tracks (a lot) then the best way, recording mixes and listening back to em (a lot).

    Making and listening back to mixes regularly you will get better, when ya jamming and just having a practice you can throw anything in to test ya mixing skills etc but when u record a mix u wanna think about it, think about a journey through ya tracks etc. Then when you listen back u may from time to time, think. oh that sounded good at the time but now i can see it maybe takes the groove down a little or it was maybe a too bigger jump in energy i should have played that later things like that. The most valubale thing a dj who wants to improve can do IMHO is make a lot of mixes and listen to em, like i said earlier, listen listen listen
    Totally agree with that. Especially recording everything and giving it a serious listen. After I was past the initial learning curve of DJing nothing improved my mixes more than recording myself all the time and really disecting what works and what doesn't, with eqing, with phrasing and with track selection. If you've got a steady gig playing out, you should still be recording yourself often. It definitely helps.
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  2. #32
    Tech Mentor Ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sobi View Post
    So how do you practice track selection at home?
    Exactly why Track Selection is a mute point. It's irrelevant to actually becoming a technically good DJ.

  3. #33
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    shouldn't a good DJ be good at all of it? There isn't one thing that is vastly more important than the others.

    Once you learn how to beatmatch and mix music it then becomes about track selection. You can't have one or two without the others.

    You practice track selection when you buy your music.
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  4. #34
    Tech Guru SirReal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ham View Post
    Exactly why Track Selection is a mute point. It's irrelevant to actually becoming a technically good DJ.
    But it is relevant to, technically, being a good DJ.
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  5. #35
    Tech Guru SirReal's Avatar
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    And BTW it's moot point, not a mute point. If it was a mute point you wouldn't have said anything.
    "Walking the fine line between Stupidity and Genious" My Soundcloud ---- My Mixcloud
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ham View Post
    Exactly why Track Selection is a mute point. It's irrelevant to actually becoming a technically good DJ.


    Not everything needs to involve physical co-ordination to be a skill that you can improve on. You gain skill by studying other peoples mixes and your own music to find what fits to create a good mix, then when its your turn to play or record a mix you make the right 'selections' based on that knowledge.

    Think about it like this.. If a Guitar player learns all the physical tricks on how to be a flashy guitarist without studying any music theory or without any artistic understanding of what sounds good it will be bad or at least could be allot better with some study.

    The same with being a DJ, if you don't take the time to know your music inside and out and know what creates a good mix for your audience it doesn't matter how well you can eq or beat match, scratch or use effects you will suck.

  7. #37
    Tech Guru deevey's Avatar
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    My 2 cents in order ...

    1. Reading a Crowd
    Feel whats happening in a room and respond accordingly based on #2

    2. Track knowledge and selection
    Know how to pick good music, and how to work your set up down and sideways to enable you to do #1 effectively.

    3. Mixing Ability / Phrasing
    Although if you have #1 & #2 down brilliantly you may pull it off assuming you don't completely fuck up with train wrecks.

    4. Technical Knowledge
    Know how to find your way around an "Analogue" club system, know your way around a real DJ mixer, and know how to level up your tracks using manual gain controls.

    If your laptop fails for any reason you will be expected to play on regardless and at the same level of awesomeness.

    Be able to the above with minimal tutoring from the resident DJ/sound tech/ lighting jock. All they should need to tell you are "this fader is deck A this is deck B, heres your master and here's your monitor".

    5. Learn how to correctly jesus pose at the appropriate time


    Final Words
    I've seen a zillion more DJ's rock a crowd harder on just 2 decks and a basic mixer than I have ever seen any Traktor DJ with a zillion effects / samples / midi controller.

    Watching a DJ watching his laptop screen all night is no fun for anyone IMHO and I know personally the best gigs I've played were the ones where the laptop stayed in its bag and I played off USB sticks, CD's or Vinyl - Less "Muck" to get in the way of better track selection and interaction with the crowd.

    Just because you can - doesn't mean you should and IMHO every DJ coming up the ranks should strive to be able to rock it on a basic 2 channel deck system and mixer.
    Last edited by deevey; 11-12-2012 at 04:19 AM.

  8. #38
    Tech Mentor Pearce161's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ham View Post
    Exactly why Track Selection is a mute point. It's irrelevant to actually becoming a technically good DJ.
    you could be the best technical dj in the world, beatmatch perfect in one bar, a whizz with effects and mixing, if you can't pick tracks to put a mix together and throw in any song in any order cause your so good at mixing u can throw anything in when u want you probably wont sound good, your sets will be all over the place or all the same sound and boring.

  9. #39
    Tech Guru dj gullum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deevey View Post

    Watching a DJ watching his laptop screen all night is no fun for anyone IMHO.
    I'd like to add if the crowed are watching the DJ all night you'r doing something wrong prople should be dancing and not watching the DJ.

    But I agree with everything you said
    DJ setup 1 - Pioneer XDJ-Aero, Pioneer DDJ-SP1, Mixvibes Cross, Macbook Air 13", Pioneer HDJ 2000. DJ setup 2 - NI Kontrol F1, Z1, X1mkII, Traktor Pro2, Macbook Air 13", Pioneer HDJ 2000 w. Production - iMac 21.5", Motu 828x, Icon Qcon Pro + EX, Nektar Panorama P4, Propellerhead Reason, Mashine Mikro(drum programer in Reason)

  10. #40
    Tech Mentor hola amigos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deevey View Post
    My 2 cents in order ...

    1. Reading a Crowd
    Feel whats happening in a room and respond accordingly based on #2

    2. Track knowledge and selection
    Know how to pick good music, and how to work your set up down and sideways to enable you to do #1 effectively.

    3. Mixing Ability / Phrasing
    Although if you have #1 & #2 down brilliantly you may pull it off assuming you don't completely fuck up with train wrecks.

    4. Technical Knowledge
    Know how to find your way around an "Analogue" club system, know your way around a real DJ mixer, and know how to level up your tracks using manual gain controls.

    If your laptop fails for any reason you will be expected to play on regardless and at the same level of awesomeness.

    Be able to the above with minimal tutoring from the resident DJ/sound tech/ lighting jock. All they should need to tell you are "this fader is deck A this is deck B, heres your master and here's your monitor".

    5. Learn how to correctly jesus pose at the appropriate time


    Final Words
    I've seen a zillion more DJ's rock a crowd harder on just 2 decks and a basic mixer than I have ever seen any Traktor DJ with a zillion effects / samples / midi controller.

    Watching a DJ watching his laptop screen all night is no fun for anyone IMHO and I know personally the best gigs I've played were the ones where the laptop stayed in its bag and I played off USB sticks, CD's or Vinyl - Less "Muck" to get in the way of better track selection and interaction with the crowd.

    Just because you can - doesn't mean you should and IMHO every DJ coming up the ranks should strive to be able to rock it on a basic 2 channel deck system and mixer.
    Very good read here. You nailed all the important parts and it makes sense. I'm in the market for a new mixer. I want a 2 channel mixer. I was debating the z2 by native instruments but knowing how much of a beginner i am. I'm not sure if i should drop the 900 bucks on that guy. I really like the feel of native instrument products. My previous mixer was the s2 and it felt a bit cheaply made. I want something more sturdy like pioneer products. I'm leaning more towards the z2 since it's built and functions seem like the right direction for me. But the price is a bit steep thats my only concern at the moment. But i agree i want too learn on a 2 channel mixer and less computer staring. So far i have traktor pro 2 software and i have enabled a function that shows the bars / counts. ( i forgot the name of the function ) but without that i would be completely lost in a song. I wish i knew more dj's in my area that would be down to hangout and learn off each other.

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