Considering going to a DJ academy
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  1. #1
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    Default Considering going to a DJ academy

    Ive been djing about 7 months and I would say i can beat match decent but I think I really need some teaching youtube videos dont do jackshit tbh I really think that some one showing me how to do it right infront of me with my own music would really benefit me. I dont even beatmatch in my earphones cus most of the time i cant hear it properly so I just keep dropping it on the one. but recently learning about harmonic mixing is a lot to take I just think ive taught myself wrong ways in some stuff and there the only ways I know. I would say im quite comfortable to do a house set and I reckon i could smash a rave but when it comes to rnb stuff i get so frustrated. and even some other genres ill get the tempos the same to 0.10 difference in traktor ill drop it in on the one and it will sound horrible.
    I think I might be trying to hard for it to be perfect, i think better quality speakers would help me.

    I know practice makes perfect but i think the dj academy would help me alot and give me more confidence, has any one even been to the dj academy ?
    http://www.djacademy.org.uk/

    I was thinking of doing the 8 week part time course for 400

  2. #2
    Tech Guru Patch's Avatar
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    DJ'ing: 2x1200MK2, DJM 850, Dicers, F1, Zomo MC-1000, Sony MDR-v700, i7 Win 10 HP Envy
    Production: Ableton Live 8 and a mouse, Sennheiser HD400, Sony VAIO

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patch View Post
    come on son put something proper or dont put anything

  4. #4

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    I would consider that a waste of time and money, honestly. Most DJs just learn everything on their own or from fellow DJs which is rare because we're mostly egoheads who think sharing info will somehow give someone else an advantage in the scene.

    Although I openly share information and answer questions, give recommendations, I would probably not waste my time physically standing there teaching someone how to mix. Some things you just can't teach. It's either in your heart or not; meaning you either have the determination to figure it out and practice daily or you don't.
    Pioneer XDJ-1000Mk1 -|- Numark TTX -|- Pioneer DJM-750

    Spinning the deepest in tech and progressive house
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  5. #5
    Tech Guru Patch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raver Ste
    come on son put something proper or dont put anything
    What do you want me to say? The OP is absolute gibberish - it sounds like you've had a brain dump, and only managed to get a bunch of half-thoughts out.

    DJ'ing is HARD to learn. Very hard. 7 months in I was still not able to differentiate between 2 sound sources. You just have to persevere. Maybe less posting and more practicing would benefit you. (Actually - I should take my own advice there... )

    Quote Originally Posted by You
    ...I would say i can beat match decent
    If you COULD beatmatch, you would know it FOR SURE. A switch goes off in your brain, and from that point on, you can't NOT beatmatch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raver Ste"
    I dont even beatmatch in my earphones cus most of the time i cant hear it properly
    You can't beatmatch.

    It's what I mentioned before - training your brain. You're hearing a single "noise" that is made up of 2 different songs being played together. When you can beatmatch, you don't hear this combined "noise" - you hear the 2 separate sounds as existing in your head completely separately.

    Like I said - if you could do it, you'd know for sure.

    The good news is, we've all been where you are, and you can get through it. The secret is practice. And more practice.
    Last edited by Patch; 09-11-2014 at 03:16 PM.
    DJ'ing: 2x1200MK2, DJM 850, Dicers, F1, Zomo MC-1000, Sony MDR-v700, i7 Win 10 HP Envy
    Production: Ableton Live 8 and a mouse, Sennheiser HD400, Sony VAIO

    Click HERE to D/L Free Tracks from Soundcloud!!!
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  6. #6
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    I think its a great idea if you want to learn new stuff, but i spent last year in one academy and I can say you will alway learn more by your own, its all a matter of time working on your skills

  7. #7
    Tech Guru DubluW's Avatar
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    Having not done anything like it, i can't recommend or knock it.

    I would say if you're looking at spending 400 on something like this after only 7 months you've got more money than sense! Honestly mate, persevere and you'll learn a lot just by messing around on your decks. Save your 400 for tunes and equipment and you wont regret it!

    Weren't you also asking on building a studio in your shed? It seems your trying to bite off more than you can chew initially. Just concentrate on the basics and progress at your own steam. You wont be getting gigs the minute you walk out the academy, you'll probably just be scratching your head wondering why you just spent all that money!

    If you want a cheaper option try this book. I read it cover to cover when i started and its brilliant!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/DJing-For-Du.../dp/0470663723
    A+H DB4, Technics 1210's x2, F1, X1MK2 x2, MaschineMk2, Akai LPK 25, MF3D, XDJ-1000 x2.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by WestonParish View Post
    I would consider that a waste of time and money, honestly. Most DJs just learn everything on their own or from fellow DJs which is rare because we're mostly egoheads who think sharing info will somehow give someone else an advantage in the scene.

    Although I openly share information and answer questions, give recommendations, I would probably not waste my time physically standing there teaching someone how to mix. Some things you just can't teach. It's either in your heart or not; meaning you either have the determination to figure it out and practice daily or you don't.
    thanks for the advice,getting into djing i was thinking it will be easy just simply because i just loved music boyyyyyyyyyyyy was i wrong

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DubluW View Post
    Having not done anything like it, i can't recommend or knock it.

    I would say if you're looking at spending 400 on something like this after only 7 months you've got more money than sense! Honestly mate, persevere and you'll learn a lot just by messing around on your decks. Save your 400 for tunes and equipment and you wont regret it!

    Weren't you also asking on building a studio in your shed? It seems your trying to bite off more than you can chew initially. Just concentrate on the basics and progress at your own steam. You wont be getting gigs the minute you walk out the academy, you'll probably just be scratching your head wondering why you just spent all that money!

    If you want a cheaper option try this book. I read it cover to cover when i started and its brilliant!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/DJing-For-Du.../dp/0470663723
    I just wanted some opinions on it, yeah i guess just more practise. and its because i just got a new job haha

  10. #10

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    That's what happened to all of us man haha. Loads of people do not understand how much work and practice goes into mixing at a professional level before they get into it. I sure didn't either. But I was a raver kid and already loved the music, after partying for a while I decided I wanted and could be the man behind the decks providing the beats. And now I am, still learning new things every single day just as you should.

    Never stop learning, if you think you're great, that's when you need to push yourself to learn something new and find something to challenge yourself like new mixing styles, attempting different genres, and definitely producing your own tracks.


    edit: Like the others have said above, I would use that extra dough from your new job to invest in well-built equipment (that you will actually use), more music because stealing music is wrong, get into vinyl and build a record collection, anything to push yourself.
    Pioneer XDJ-1000Mk1 -|- Numark TTX -|- Pioneer DJM-750

    Spinning the deepest in tech and progressive house
    www.soundcloud.com/westonparish
    www.facebook.com/djwestonparish

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