Should a Beginner DJ start with a controller, a CDJ or vinyl?
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  1. #1
    Tech Guru ImNotDedYet's Avatar
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    Well, if you can afford either of the options, I'd go with what you really want to do, bearing in mind that CDJs and Vinyl will take a bit longer to get anything actually good due to having to learn beat matching. Yes, those two options are expensive, but they can also be integrated with your DJ software which provides the ability to play digital files in the case of turntables. (so you're not merely spending lots on vinyl, but can combine the two) You'll need a software-certified interface or mixer for this though)

    Controller is the cheapest and easiest of the bunch, but if you really want to do turntables or CDJs and can afford it, I'd just go with whatever is going to make you happiest and provide the most enjoyment.
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  2. #2
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    I started with belt driven turntables before I even got to direct drive. Once I got that I was so amazed at how much easier it was to beatmatch. Then came the dvs and I again was blown away at being able to see the bpm. Now i've switched to a numark ns6 and amazed again. I never took the road down cdjs though.

    If you want something fun, fast and easy, choose the controller. If you're up for it, dvs is great.

    I use one of the channels of my ns6 with a stanton st8-150. the other one is just sitting aside lonely.

  3. #3
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    I would definitely start with turntables to get an inner understanding of what DJing is and what it means fundamentally. Once you get good at transitions move to a controller.

    By this point it should be easy mode to transition and within a couple months it will become second nature, a part of you.

    After that the fun part begins, I personally love adding stuff to tracks or taking away via filters or stems. And theres infinite options of what to do here which means that you will never stop growing and if you keep going your brain will become huge and eventually explode.

  4. #4
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    Most controllers/DJ software will allow you to manually beat-match.
    If you don't look at the display you can even do 'the old tricks' to match the tempo 'by ear' (manually) too.
    In reality, there's not going to be many times you'll ever need to do this, but just in case it's a good plan to have the skill available.

  5. #5
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    I think the best thing to start out on is one of the more basic, inexpensive CDJs you can get now. Turntables are NOT the way to start on as a beginner in 2017... it will drain you financially trying to buy a lot of vinyl records and building your collection. You can get a pair of CDJ 800s for under $800 and burn your own CDs and learn how to beatmatch. These skills will carry over to the big-boy CDJs and your can then start on software and expanding your set.
    Jackal Jyve // New York City // @JackalJyve // www.JackalJyve.com

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by JackalJyve View Post
    I think the best thing to start out on is one of the more basic, inexpensive CDJs you can get now. Turntables are NOT the way to start on as a beginner in 2017... it will drain you financially trying to buy a lot of vinyl records and building your collection. You can get a pair of CDJ 800s for under $800 and burn your own CDs and learn how to beatmatch. These skills will carry over to the big-boy CDJs and your can then start on software and expanding your set.
    couldnt have said it better 100% agreed

  7. #7
    Tech Guru deevey's Avatar
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    A few years ago, I would have said the 800's would have been the ticket, However things have changed, CDJ's utilize desktop software & USB drives.

    Personally I'd go with a standalone controller running rekordbox. e.g. XDJ-RX, it functions the same as a big boys CDJ, has a built in mixer and your setup will use the same software.

    Can be had for around the same price as a pair of good 800's and a decent mixer - want to learn how to beatmatch ? Simple, don't press sync.

    It's 2017, its highly unlikely you will be presented with anything less than a rekordbox capable CDJ at any gig in the future.

  8. #8
    Tech Mentor blackavenger's Avatar
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    Vinyl.
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  9. #9
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    Vinyl is extremely expensive and will wear out over time, but is the most fun, engaging, and has the highest "cred" when you use it live. If you're rich, then go for vinyl. Otherwise, digital media players from Hanpin and deactivate the BPM display. No moving waveforms to distract you. Something like the Reloop RMP-3 Alpha or the American Audio Radius 3000 players have superior pitch resolution to Denon and Pioneer. There are other brandings from Stanton and DJ Tech in the US for them, but don't get better than 0.1% pitch resolution on USB flash drive internal mode in their firmware, unfortunately. If you don't have a mixer already, then an all-in-one unit like the Versadeck is a good idea, though it has inferior firmware to some of the later brandings of it from Omnitronic, Akyama, and Reloop. The Versadeck firmware does some funky stuff when you fast forward tracks too quickly, but if you're careful, that's the most glaring issue for it. Mixer Mode on it's a little hard and glassy sounding, but usable.
    Last edited by Reticuli; 03-07-2017 at 12:38 PM.

  10. #10
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    Hi, in first you don't need nothing about vinyl or cdj bye a 10 Euro controler + software on your computer , go to beatport every weeks and take 10 or 15 tracks you njoy and play it ,after few month and much money if you like djing realy cruch your pig
    Last edited by dj wo k; 03-08-2017 at 12:47 PM.
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